American Bar Association approves dropping LSAT for law school admission

JThe American Bar Association has come out in favor of abandoning standardized tests for law school admissions in a memo recently released and approved by the organization’s strategic review committee.

The change in the bar’s position to make standardized admissions tests optional could significantly affect how the law school admissions test, which law school applicants must currently pass, is used in admissions. at law school.

“Eliminating the requirement for a ‘valid and reliable’ admissions test also eliminates some of the challenges inherent in determining which tests are in fact valid and reliable for law school admissions, although the Law schools must of course always show that their use of an admissions test, if they choose to require one, is consistent with good admissions practices and procedures,” the ABA memorandum states.

LARGEST UNIVERSITY SYSTEM IN USA ELIMINATES STANDARDIZED TESTING REQUIREMENTS

In November 2021, the ABA previously approved the use of the GRE in law school admissions, but the association’s recommendation makes use of any test entirely optional.

While standardized tests have been part of college and graduate school admission requirements for decades, there has been a recent movement to eliminate the requirement, primarily at the undergraduate level. Several colleges and universities across the country had dropped standardized testing requirements amid the coronavirus pandemic, but as the health crisis subsided, some are making the change permanent.

In March, the California State University system announced it would eliminate consideration of the SAT and ACT in its undergraduate admissions to “level the playing field” for college. admission to universities in the system. Harvard University also announced in December that it would no longer require the SAT for admission.

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In January, the College Board, which administers the SAT, announced that the college entrance exam would be shortened by one hour and be administered entirely online. The board said the changes would make the SAT “easier to take, easier to give and more relevant.”

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