Japanese school – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 13:08:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://taipeijs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-4-32x32.png Japanese school – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ 32 32 Japanese schoolchildren sent a message in a bottle. He ran aground in Hawaii 37 years later. ⋆ 4State News MO AR KS OK https://taipeijs.org/japanese-schoolchildren-sent-a-message-in-a-bottle-he-ran-aground-in-hawaii-37-years-later-%e2%8b%86-4state-news-mo-ar-ks-ok/ https://taipeijs.org/japanese-schoolchildren-sent-a-message-in-a-bottle-he-ran-aground-in-hawaii-37-years-later-%e2%8b%86-4state-news-mo-ar-ks-ok/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/japanese-schoolchildren-sent-a-message-in-a-bottle-he-ran-aground-in-hawaii-37-years-later-%e2%8b%86-4state-news-mo-ar-ks-ok/ https://kubrick.htvapps.com/htv-prod-media.s3.amazonaws.com/images/message-in-bottle-japan-1632128267.jpg A glass bottle with a 1984 message washed up in Hawaii and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl – 37 years after high school students in Japan threw it into the ocean as part of an experiment. The message in a bottle, titled “Investigating Ocean Currents” was written by students and placed in Kuroshio […]]]>

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A glass bottle with a 1984 message washed up in Hawaii and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl – 37 years after high school students in Japan threw it into the ocean as part of an experiment. The message in a bottle, titled “Investigating Ocean Currents” was written by students and placed in Kuroshio Current near Miyajima Island, western Japan, as part of a school project on ocean currents. The letter sealed inside, dated July 1984, asked whoever found the bottle to bring it back to school, Choshi High School. The bottle finder, named in local Hawaii media as Abbie Graham, 9, was visiting with family at a beach near the town of Hilo, Hawaii, when she discovered him. He had traveled approximately 4,350 miles. The school said in a press release that it released 450 bottles in 1984 and another 300 in 1985 as part of its ocean currents investigation. So far, 51 have been found and returned. However, the school added, it is the only bottle to have been found since 2002. Other bottles of the experiment failed in Washington State in the United States, Canada, the Philippines and the islands. Marshall in the Central Pacific. The English message in a bottle ends up in the Azores Mayumi Kanda, a former student of the school, who was a member of the science club in 1984, said she was surprised the bottle had reappeared after so long. She said the news broke “brought back nostalgic memories of my high school years.” Choshi High School said its students plan to write to Abbie thanking her for returning it. the fisherman’s flag was once used to indicate a good move – with the letter as a gift.

A glass bottle with a 1984 message washed up in Hawaii and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl – 37 years after Japanese high school students threw it into the ocean as part of an experiment.

The message in a bottle, titled “Investigating Ocean Currents,” was written by students and placed in Kuroshio Current near Miyajima Island, western Japan, as part of a project school on ocean currents.

The letter sealed inside, dated July 1984, asked whoever found the bottle to bring it back to school, Choshi High School.

The bottle finder, named in local Hawaii media as 9-year-old Abbie Graham, was on a family visit to a beach near the town of Hilo, Hawaii, when she discovered him. He had traveled some 4,350 miles.

The school said in a press release that it released 450 bottles in 1984 and another 300 in 1985 as part of its investigation of ocean currents.

So far, 51 have been found and returned. However, the school added, it is the only bottle found since 2002.

Other bottles of the experiment failed in Washington State in the United States, Canada, the Philippines and the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific.

Related video: New England message in a bottle ends up in the Azores

Mayumi Kanda, a former student of the school, who was a member of the science club in 1984, said she was surprised the bottle had reappeared after so long. She said hearing the news “brought back nostalgic memories of my high school years.”

Choshi High School said its students plan to write to Abbie thanking her for returning it.

They said they would include a miniature Tairyo-bata – a type of fisherman’s flag once used to indicate a good move – with the letter as a gift.

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Japanese schoolchildren sent a message in a bottle. 37 years later, he ran aground in Hawaii https://taipeijs.org/japanese-schoolchildren-sent-a-message-in-a-bottle-37-years-later-he-ran-aground-in-hawaii/ https://taipeijs.org/japanese-schoolchildren-sent-a-message-in-a-bottle-37-years-later-he-ran-aground-in-hawaii/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/japanese-schoolchildren-sent-a-message-in-a-bottle-37-years-later-he-ran-aground-in-hawaii/ By Junko Ogura and Sara Spary, CNN (CNN) – A glass bottle with a message from 1984 washed up in Hawaii and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl – 37 years after high school students in Japan threw it into the ocean as part of a ‘an experiment. The message in a bottle, titled “Investigating […]]]>

By Junko Ogura and Sara Spary, CNN

(CNN) – A glass bottle with a message from 1984 washed up in Hawaii and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl – 37 years after high school students in Japan threw it into the ocean as part of a ‘an experiment.

The message in a bottle, titled “Investigating Ocean Currents,” was written by students and placed in Kuroshio Current near Miyajima Island, western Japan, as part of a project school on ocean currents.

The letter sealed inside, dated July 1984, asked whoever found the bottle to bring it back to school, Choshi High School.

The person who found the bottle, named in local Hawaii media as Abbie Graham, 9, was visiting family at a beach near the town of Hilo, Hawaii, when she got it. discovery. He had traveled some 4,350 miles.

The school said in a press release that it released 450 bottles in 1984 and another 300 in 1985 as part of its investigation of ocean currents.

So far, 51 have been found and returned. However, the school added, it is the only bottle found since 2002.

Other bottles of the experiment failed in Washington State in the United States, Canada, the Philippines and the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific.

Mayumi Kanda, a former student of the school, who was a member of the science club in 1984, said she was surprised the bottle had reappeared after so long. She said hearing the news “brought back nostalgic memories of my high school years.”

Choshi High School said its students plan to write to Abbie thanking her for returning it.

They said they would include a miniature Tairyo-bata – a type of fisherman’s flag once used to indicate a good move – with the letter as a gift.

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Japanese school students in Dubai present silk scarf to United Arab Emirates Olympic delegation for Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games – News https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-students-in-dubai-present-silk-scarf-to-united-arab-emirates-olympic-delegation-for-tokyo-2021-olympic-games-news/ https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-students-in-dubai-present-silk-scarf-to-united-arab-emirates-olympic-delegation-for-tokyo-2021-olympic-games-news/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-students-in-dubai-present-silk-scarf-to-united-arab-emirates-olympic-delegation-for-tokyo-2021-olympic-games-news/ The UAE National Olympic Committee was presented with a silk scarf as part of the UAE-Japan Friendship Project by students from the Japanese School in Dubai. The silk scarf, made from the endemic Japanese silkworm “Koishimaru” raised in the United Arab Emirates by schoolchildren, was woven to recreate the national costume and national flag of […]]]>

The UAE National Olympic Committee was presented with a silk scarf as part of the UAE-Japan Friendship Project by students from the Japanese School in Dubai.

The silk scarf, made from the endemic Japanese silkworm “Koishimaru” raised in the United Arab Emirates by schoolchildren, was woven to recreate the national costume and national flag of the United Arab Emirates. It was presented to the United Arab Emirates Olympic delegation to be worn at the opening ceremony of the Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games.

The presentation ceremony was attended by Ahmad Ibrahim Alblooshi, President of the Technical and Sports Department of the National Olympic Committee (NOC) of the United Arab Emirates; Sekiguchi Noboru, Consul General of Japan in Dubai and the Northern Emirates; Dr Azza bint Suleiman, Deputy Secretary General for Administrative Affairs, NOC; Masao Wada, president of the Japanese school in Dubai; and Masami Ando, ​​Director General of the Japan Foreign Trade Organization (JETRO) Dubai; as well as dignitaries and students from the Japanese School in Dubai.

Satisfied with the children’s efforts, Alblooshi said, “We’ve been working on it for a year and a half now to get to this point. I am happy that this collaboration was supported by the top management and all those involved. Students from the Japanese School in Dubai worked hard on this project for the United Arab Emirates Olympic delegation. We are very proud and thank the support of the Japanese government.

Expressing his sincere gratitude, Consul General Noboru: “Today we are witnessing great achievement from the next generation of young people, students of the Japanese School in Dubai and others. These scarves which are presented to the NOC are made from the silk of the endemic Japanese silkworms Koishimaru. I am sure the Japanese people would be very happy to know that the United Arab Emirates delegation to the Olympic Games in Tokyo next month will wear these scarves and march in the opening ceremony of the games.

Giving more details on the preparations for the games, the CG said the Tokyo Olympics will be safe and secure in the face of the risks posed by Covid-19. After the postponement of the games for one year in 2020, the Tokyo Olympics will be significant in the face of the following points of view, he added.

Explaining the above, he continued, “First, to impart the power of sport to people in Japan and around the world; second, to show Japan’s recovery from the Great Eastern Japan earthquake in 2011; and finally, to present the reconstruction of Japan at the optimum time to overcome the pandemic as well as to meet global challenges.

“The Olympic Games will also remind us of the unity of peoples, and of nations in general, to build peace in the world. We will be able to realize through the games that it is important to make efforts. In addition, I believe that the Tokyo Olympics will be a valuable opportunity for Japan to convey its various appeals, including culture, to the world. Young Japanese people have already achieved these goals thanks to this silk project. They have worked hard to breed the traditional Japanese silkworm with perseverance and the world will surely find allure at the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Olympics through the scarves. I hope this project will help improve our mutual understanding and foster new friendly relations between Japan and UAE.

Fostering bilateral trade relations between UAE and Japan, JETRO was leading this project in UAE. Of the organization, Ando noted: “I am personally impressed on this day. We encourage bilateral trade and investment between the two countries. In recent years, the Japanese silk industry has declined. We were approached about this project of making scarves for the NOC delegation and it was implemented with the help of Japanese students and the endemic silkworm. It has become a matter of attention between the two nations. The project is also a good opportunity to promote the Japanese silk trade in the United Arab Emirates. “

He added: “I have spoken to Japanese schools in Abu Dhabi and Dubai about the viability of the operation for this project. The response has been positive from students and teachers. It was a tedious project because the silkworm cannot survive in this climate. We made the effort to make this dream project a success. However, this is not the finale, but just the beginning. I think it’s wonderful to be able to collaborate for today’s presentation ceremony.

A remote participant from Japan, Yano, Director of Presentation, Tokyo Olympic Organizing Committee, said: “We are only one month away from the start of the Olympic Games. Preparations are extremely busy as we prepare under strict security measures for the games that will take place during the pandemic. With Expo 2020 Dubai coming after the Tokyo Olympics, I hope the children will continue this project and support the relationships more. “

According to the Japanese Consul General, “This ceremony represents exactly the long-standing friendship between the two nations. The silkworm raised by these schoolchildren is not easy to breed. It is a species of silkworm endemic to Japan. However, their efforts paid off in this climate and they succeeded in obtaining the cocoon and the silk to make the scarves. The students thought about the friendly relations between the two countries and tried to help strengthen the ties. “



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A Japanese school published its yearbook photo. She says it was racist. https://taipeijs.org/a-japanese-school-published-its-yearbook-photo-she-says-it-was-racist/ https://taipeijs.org/a-japanese-school-published-its-yearbook-photo-she-says-it-was-racist/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/a-japanese-school-published-its-yearbook-photo-she-says-it-was-racist/ Ai Nishida’s hair is naturally brown (left), but her hair has been altered to appear black in her school yearbook (right). Photo: Courtesy of Ai Nishida Ai Nishida had never been punished for her brown hair before. Like many other schools in Japan, her college required all students to have black hair. But after telling […]]]>
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Ai Nishida’s hair is naturally brown (left), but her hair has been altered to appear black in her school yearbook (right). Photo: Courtesy of Ai Nishida

Ai Nishida had never been punished for her brown hair before.

Like many other schools in Japan, her college required all students to have black hair. But after telling her teachers about her mixed heritage, she was exempt from this rule. Plus, she thought, she looked like a mixed Japanese and white girl, so teachers were unlikely to forget that her lighter hair color was natural.

But when she received her college directory just days after graduating, she was shocked to see that her photo had been altered. Nishida’s hair was painted black, a thick plaque smeared over her locks. For the first time, she felt someone telling her she looked bad. She called the school’s actions “racist”.

Nishida’s experience is one of many other cases of students penalized by the long-standing strict rules of Japanese schools. But in recent years, activists and graduates have called for an end to draconian rules known as buraku kousoku, lest they hamper the diversity and individual freedom of students.

A high-profile case involving a student in Osaka sparked the current national debate over Japanese rules. In October 2017, a high school student sued her school for mental distress after her institution repeatedly asked her to dye her naturally brown hair black. Although she first obeyed the institution’s rules, she eventually stopped, which led the school to verify her roots, remove her desk from the classroom, and clear her name from their names. lists.

His case prompted the formation of advocacy groups, such as Buraku Kousoku, a non-governmental agency that collects information about draconian school rules. The group filed a petition and called for reform of the national education system.

In February, the Osaka District Court ordered the local government to pay the high school student $ 3,100 for emotional damage. However, he ruled that the school had the right to impose regulations on the hair.

Nishida said that with the growing national discussion and increasing reporting on buraku kousoku, she felt motivated to speak out about her experience, which occurred in 2007.

Just in February, the Fukuoka Prefecture Bar, where his college is located, gathered and released official data demonstrating how strict the school rules were.

According to a survey in Fukuoka City, the Bar Association found that 57 out of 69 municipal high schools had rules on the color and pattern of students’ underwear. In some institutions, if a student disobeyed these regulations, they had to take off their underwear and guardians were informed of their actions.

japan, school, rules, discrimination, photo, yearbook, edited, racism

Throughout college, Nishida’s brown hair was never an issue. Photo: Courtesy of Ai Nishida

Although Nishida’s experiences in college took place years ago, she was stunned to learn that students were still penalized this way. “I asked myself, ‘How often does this happen? Is that even allowed? ‘ That’s why I felt I had to share my experiences on social media, ”she told VICE World News. Now 29, Nishida works as a freelance model and writer.

At the time, she didn’t tell anyone other than her mom about her edited yearbook photo. The graduates received their yearbooks a few days after their graduation ceremony. Nishida therefore felt that it was pointless to challenge an institution to which she would never return.

“I also remember everyone getting so excited to receive their directories that they just started exchanging and signing them. I didn’t have time to process what I had just seen in this frenzy, ”she said.

When Nishida brought the phone book home, her mother was furious to discover that her daughter’s photo had been tampered with. She called the school, Maizuru Middle School, a few days later, demanding an explanation. Nishida only learned about this recently.

“They confessed to my mother that they had retouched the photo. They didn’t apologize for their actions and didn’t feel like they had done something wrong, ”Nishida said.

In a telephone interview, the current principal of Maizuru secondary school, Nosaka Karuyuki, told VICE World News that it was “unfortunate that she felt this way, but we cannot comment on what happened. passed because the faculty in charge while she was a student has all left. “

The school has since lifted the rules on hair color, although Karuyuki couldn’t provide an exact date when things changed.

The draconian rules in Japanese schools are believed to date back to the 1870s, when the government began regulating education. The 1970s and 1980s saw growing protests against buraku kousoku, as educators imposed increasingly stringent regulations to crack down on violence and bullying in schools. Despite a decline in school-related offenses, most kousoku, including regulations on the color of underwear, clothing, and student love life, remained in place.

Nishida recalled that at her middle school, although certain rules were enforced for both girls and boys, such as banning eyebrows, most were split based on gender.

The boys couldn’t let their hair grow past their ears. The girls had to tie their hair up, using only black or navy rubber bands. Skirts had to drop below their knees, and female students were subjected to random inspections to make sure they followed the rules. They were lined up in the gymnasium and told to kneel; if their skirts did not touch the floor, they were asked to leave the classroom and immediately purchase a new, longer uniform.

japan, school, rules, discrimination, photo, yearbook, edited, racism

Nishida, seen in this image from her school years, believes rules requiring black hair dictate racial diversity. Photo: Courtesy of Ai Nishida

Nishida also said that setting straight black hair as the norm and requiring students to submit proof if their hair was naturally a different color or texture was undermining racial diversity. .

“It reinforces the idea that straight black hair, a quintessentially Japanese look, is fair. Everything else was wrong. But that’s what we’re born with, there’s nothing we can do about it, ”she said of her brown hair.

When asked why these rules exist and still apply, educators at Maizuru Middle School told students that it was in their own best interests.

“They were like, ‘You don’t want to stand out and have all eyes on you to look different, do you?’ We were told we would be the losers for holding on. Many of us did as we were told because if you didn’t you would be asked to leave the classroom and that meant missing your education, ”Nishida said.

With a Japanese mother and an American father, Nishida realized that she looked unconventional.

In middle school, the boys called her gaijin (foreigner) to provoke her. She was using her father’s white last name at the time, and no one made fun of having a last name written in katakana (alphabet for foreign and borrowed words). Among the girls, she was called cute, admired for her brown hair and large eyes.

“I feel like my Métis identity invites people to ask me really personal questions. They were asking how my parents met, or what my household was like. It’s not something you normally find out about when you first meet someone, ”she said.

Stereotypes about half-breeds also made Nishida feel like she couldn’t meet people’s expectations.

“Because I’m mixed, people would assume that I speak English or that I’m athletic and my family is wealthy. But it never was. I don’t speak English, I’m horrible at sports and my mom is a single mom – we were really poor, ”she said.

Such draconian school rules and harsh learning environments caused her to drop out of high school, according to Nishida.

The overwhelming amount of class and the stress of trying to follow every minute of the rule led her to sink into depression. But despite feeling the school system abandoned her, she admitted that she was more privileged than some.

“Being half white means that I am not racially profiled by the police. My skin has also never been a problem. People walk away when I say buraku kousoku is a human rights issue, but I want to use my privilege to talk about what I’ve been through, ”she said.

“People shouldn’t feel like they were born with the wrong things to be successful in this society.”

Follow Hanako Montgomery on Twitter and Instagram.



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Al-Sisi meets with experts overseeing the Egyptian-Japanese school system https://taipeijs.org/al-sisi-meets-with-experts-overseeing-the-egyptian-japanese-school-system/ https://taipeijs.org/al-sisi-meets-with-experts-overseeing-the-egyptian-japanese-school-system/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/al-sisi-meets-with-experts-overseeing-the-egyptian-japanese-school-system/ Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi received on Tuesday a group of Japanese experts overseeing the Egyptian-Japanese school system in the country. The meeting took place in the presence of the Minister of Education and Technical Education Tarek Shawky, and Nevine Farouk, Supervisor of the Egyptian-Japanese Schools Unit. During the meeting, the two sides reviewed the […]]]>

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi received on Tuesday a group of Japanese experts overseeing the Egyptian-Japanese school system in the country.

The meeting took place in the presence of the Minister of Education and Technical Education Tarek Shawky, and Nevine Farouk, Supervisor of the Egyptian-Japanese Schools Unit.

During the meeting, the two sides reviewed the efforts of Japanese experts in coordination with the Ministry of Education and Technical Education to establish the school administration rules followed in Japan. These efforts have also served to implement the Japanese education system, an integral part of which is “tokatsu”, throughout Egypt.

Al-Sisi also praised the Japanese experts for their work in this vital national project which is part of the state’s strategy to train Egyptian citizens. He stressed that the strategy includes the introduction of a comprehensive education system that balances academic aspects and the development of the student’s ability to think and innovate on their own.

The president spoke with Japanese experts to learn about their experience in Egypt since starting their work in the country, overseeing administration in Egyptian-Japanese schools.

Experts said the periodic performance reviews reflected the successful launch of the new system and the establishment of the basic principles of Japanese education in schools in Egypt.

They also expressed their honor to meet President Al-Sisi and underlined their concern to consolidate the foundations of the Japanese education system in Egypt.

This includes the process of teacher training and the development of educational programs in coordination with the Egyptian Ministry of Education and Technical Education.

Experts further praised the seriousness of the Egyptian government in developing the country’s education system to the highest standards.

Meanwhile, they praised the level of Egyptian teachers working in the Egyptian-Japanese school system and their ability to understand the concept and principles of the Japanese education system.

The meeting provided an opportunity to review the various activities implemented in Egyptian-Japanese schools within the framework of the “tokatsu” system.

Egypt is the first country in the world to adopt this system after Japan. It is based on the preparation of an integrated approach to develop children’s personality from the start and their acquisition of positive values, behaviors, skills and habits.

The most notable are: taking responsibility; cleanliness; order; commitment; independence; and problem solving, among other qualities that grow and integrate over successive school years.




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Japanese School Lunch Noodles So Deep Fried Kids and Teachers Breach Their Teeth and Go to Hospital https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-lunch-noodles-so-deep-fried-kids-and-teachers-breach-their-teeth-and-go-to-hospital/ https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-lunch-noodles-so-deep-fried-kids-and-teachers-breach-their-teeth-and-go-to-hospital/#respond Sat, 13 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-lunch-noodles-so-deep-fried-kids-and-teachers-breach-their-teeth-and-go-to-hospital/ Beneath these vegetables hides a mass of crispy nightmares. Japanese schools are well known for providing healthy and balanced lunches for students, especially compared to some other countries where fries and pizza are the norm at lunchtime. But despite their excellent record, from time to time there will be a to glide. This is what […]]]>

Beneath these vegetables hides a mass of crispy nightmares.

Japanese schools are well known for providing healthy and balanced lunches for students, especially compared to some other countries where fries and pizza are the norm at lunchtime.

But despite their excellent record, from time to time there will be a to glide. This is what happened on March 11 at Asaka Daigo Primary School in Asaka City, Saitama Prefecture.

Seven people, a teacher and six students, ended up with chipped teeth after eating school lunch, and three of the children had to go to the hospital. The cause of their injuries: the noodles were fried too hard.

Not the sensei you want to see after lunch.

The meal in question was sara udon (“Udon plate”), a Nagasaki dish that puts cooked vegetables and meat on fried noodles. Unlike other udon dishes, noodles are meant to be crispy rather than soft and chewy.

▼ Watch 3:18 in this video to see the toppings
put on fried and crispy noodles.

Apparently what went wrong was the cooking time of the noodles. Instead of being fried for two to three minutes as it should, they were fried for ten minutes, making them extremely hard. The staff who prepared the food on site at the school did not have instructions for the correct cooking time and chose to fry it longer because “it didn’t look like it was finished yet.”

In addition, the day before, sixth grade children received donuts that had expired a year ago, due to a delivery error.

The school’s catering service said it was taking action to prevent this from happening again, but Japanese Internet users had many pressing concerns:

“Children are told to eat everything, so they did it, even though it hurt them. “
“They’re supposed to eat quietly too, so they couldn’t even ask for help.”
“Awful, imagine them forcing themselves to eat something so hard.”
“And donuts too… what’s going on there?” “
“I can’t believe the professor broke his tooth too.”

Although we don’t know the details of what happened with the teacher, it was probably expected that they would act as a good role model for the children and eat their meal no matter what, so that the children also eat theirs. Normally that’s not a bad idea, but unfortunately it has had some unfortunate consequences here.

First grade kids aren’t allowed to wear underwear during gym class, now this? It’s only a matter of time before something really weird happens, like a teacher stealing students’ right-footed shoes from their lockers.

Source: NHK via Hachima Kiko
Top image: Gahag, Flickr / Banzai Hiroaki (edited by SoraNews24)
Insert Image: Gahag

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Hokusai project lights up Japanese culture center and school https://taipeijs.org/hokusai-project-lights-up-japanese-culture-center-and-school/ https://taipeijs.org/hokusai-project-lights-up-japanese-culture-center-and-school/#respond Tue, 09 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/hokusai-project-lights-up-japanese-culture-center-and-school/ Artist Shuji Nishimura takes the stage to unveil his new mural at the LBJCC Auditorium. On site (left to right) Takato “Tim” Hayashi of the JBA; Jay Shaheen, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the LBJCC; the director of the Japanese language school, Mihoko Tanabe; and Saya Kawai of the JBA. (Photos by TOMOKO […]]]>
Artist Shuji Nishimura takes the stage to unveil his new mural at the LBJCC Auditorium. On site (left to right) Takato “Tim” Hayashi of the JBA; Jay Shaheen, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the LBJCC; the director of the Japanese language school, Mihoko Tanabe; and Saya Kawai of the JBA. (Photos by TOMOKO NAGAI / Rafu Shimpo)

By TOMOKO NAGAI, Rafu staff writer

LONG BEACH – One day in late January, despite the stormy weather, an artist worked silently with his brush, all by himself, in the auditorium of the Long Beach Japanese Cultural Center (LBJCC). His name is Shuji Nishimura and the day was his 13e of a two week project.

A mural is painted on the back wall of the stage, approximately 9 x 20 feet. LBJCC won a grant from the Japan Business Association of Southern California (JBA), whose education and culture committee offers Japanese Enrichment Grants (JEG).

Born in 1972 in Hyogo Prefecture, Nishimura arrived in the United States in 1999 and currently lives in South Bay. He continued his art while working as a graphic designer and started creating chalk art in 2007. He went on to win awards in various competitions including the Pasadena Chalk Festival, where artists draw pictures on the streets. . Nishimura focuses on realism, exploring how close he can get to photography with the art of chalk.

For the LBJCC project, using a huge wall as a canvas was not a problem as it often works on large pieces.

Nishimura recreates the famous ukiyo-e “The great wave off Kanagawa” (Kanagawa-oki Nami Ura) by Katsushika Hokusai. Mount Fuji can be seen in the background with small boats caught in the swelling waves. It is Hokusai’s most famous work and represents Japanese culture.

“I’ve painted ‘The Great Wave’ three or four times so far, so I wasn’t worried,” says Nishimura.

After covering the back wall with white, Nishimura painstakingly hand-recreated “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” for two weeks.

His work began by erasing the existing 25-year-old fuzzy paint. Then, on the white wall, he dynamically draws a big wave higher than his height, and splashes. About two weeks later that day, the project is almost complete. He put the finishing touches on the mural by carefully drawing the name of the sponsoring organization, JBA, and a photo of “Amabie”.

What is Amabie? It is an apparition (yokai) that lives in the sea, according to a legend that has been passed down in Japan for a few hundred years. Amabie has been a relatively unknown monster character. However, since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic last year, she has become popular and idolized in Japan as a talisman to dispel the plague.

With Amabie praying for the end of the century-long pandemic, Hokusai’s mural is nearing completion. The only disappointment is that the center is closed due to a pandemic. There is still time to show the new scene mural to members of the community center.

LBJCC has long contributed to the Japanese American community in Long Beach as a base for learning Japanese language and culture. Due to its proximity to Terminal Island, which flourished as a pre-war Japanese fishing village, many Japanese Americans lived nearby at one time. Although the number is said to have dropped significantly, it still has 300 families as members and more than 100 people gather for the pancake breakfast. In addition to the Japanese language school, there are courses such as kendo, judo, karate, calligraphy, and flower arranging.

The mural includes a mythical figure, Amabie.

The stage usually hosts the speech competition and skit presentations of the students in Japanese, as well as cultural performances for the various summer holidays and festivals. The establishment has been closed since the COVID-19 epidemic. The Japanese language school has been brought online and will continue to do so for some time.

In the midst of so much melancholy, the approval of the grant brought some light to LBJCC.

The Japan Enrichment Grant (JEG) annually contributes to educational institutions and organizations engaged in activities aimed at disseminating Japanese culture, traditions and language. In FY2020, a total of $ 25,000 was donated to ten projects, including a tea ceremony demonstration via Zoom for a high school, a performance of children’s story “Momotaro” for an elementary school , a Japanese cooking experience and the purchase of Japanese musical instruments and books.

Takato Hayashi, the head of JEG, praised the Hokusai project. “A wonderful project that allows local people to see and understand Japanese culture and Japanese painting. I was impressed with their appeal in the application process. Such a wonderful concept that the famous Japanese art painting will encourage and energize members of the Cultural Center and the local community. It was perfect.”

He said the project motivated him to agree to support LBJCC.

JEG funds are generated individually by the Education and Culture Committee each year, rather than being allocated by JBA. The committee hosts an annual charity golf event and committee members are enthusiastic about their mission. Funds raised through the golf tournament provide educational support to the local community.

2020 has been life changing with a pandemic no one ever imagined. The committee was concerned about how they might support the community in such circumstances. “However,” said Saya Kawai, 2020 chair of the committee, “contrary to our anxiety, despite the school being closed and all events canceled, new educational ideas arose. We received as many applications as we normally get it in other years. We have been deeply impressed by the educators and teachers who continue to provide learning opportunities for students. It has been a very encouraging year for us.

With the approval of the grant, the board of directors of the LBJCC decided on the final design based on the three photos of Hokusai submitted by Nishimura. “Our Board of Directors chose this one… most iconic work,” said Jay Shaheen, Chairman of the Board.

On February 13, two weeks after the completion of the mural, a small ceremony took place. A few board members were invited with social distancing in mind. Participants who saw the completed mural for the first time were amazed at the grandeur and power of the work. They look forward to the day the center reopens and the mural will impress even more people.

Shaheen said, “We are lucky that JBA is supporting us. We will definitely be supporting JBA in one way or another, word of mouth they do such a good job. For our community center itself and also for the Japanese language school, this is going to be very valuable. Japanese art gives a good impression to those who come here. All in all, it is beautiful.

Hayashi of JBA said, if the COVID situation continues for some time in 2021, “The mission of the education and culture committee will not change. We will focus on how to operate in this environment, in order to contribute to local communities and share Japanese culture.

Expressing his motivation, Nishimura said, “I would like to continue drawing in various forms. I would love to paint on any occasion if the opportunity is given to me, regardless of the location, whether indoors or outdoors.

Nishimura’s amazing works can be seen on his Facebook page. A mural of Nishimura can also be found on the exterior wall of the Art and Fish restaurant, located on Mateo Street in the Los Angeles Arts District, near Little Tokyo.

https://www.jba.org/

https://www.jba.org/fr/

www.LBJCC.org

https://www.facebook.com/shuji.nishimura.12


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Brown-haired girl sues Japanese school for telling her to dye her hair black, court rules https://taipeijs.org/brown-haired-girl-sues-japanese-school-for-telling-her-to-dye-her-hair-black-court-rules/ https://taipeijs.org/brown-haired-girl-sues-japanese-school-for-telling-her-to-dye-her-hair-black-court-rules/#respond Thu, 18 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/brown-haired-girl-sues-japanese-school-for-telling-her-to-dye-her-hair-black-court-rules/ Four-year trial ends in victory for former student, but not one she hoped for. On the surface, school dress codes are meant to eliminate distractions, and therefore it is common for Japanese schools to prohibit students from dyeing their hair. However, problems can arise if schools rigidly assume that no one dyed their hair will […]]]>

Four-year trial ends in victory for former student, but not one she hoped for.

On the surface, school dress codes are meant to eliminate distractions, and therefore it is common for Japanese schools to prohibit students from dyeing their hair. However, problems can arise if schools rigidly assume that no one dyed their hair will always result in everyone having the same hair color.

Although the vast majority of ethnically Japanese people, who make up the vast majority of students in schools in Japan, are naturally dark-haired, some Japanese have hair that is rather dark brown. This can lead to situations where a school tells a brown haired student to dye their hair black., often based on the fact that they don’t believe the student’s natural hair color is brown and try to get away with coloring it.

This was the case of a teenager attending Kaifukan Prefectural High School in the town of Habikino, Osaka Prefecture. The girl enrolled in 2015 and was repeatedly said that she had to dye her brown hair black. The girl insisted that brown was her natural hair color, but the school says three different teachers examined the roots of the girl’s hair and found it to be black, which they took as proof that she had colored her hair.

▼ At least they weren’t checking the color of her bra like some schools did.

Finally, the young girl, who is now 21, claims that she was told “If you are not going to dye your hair black [i.e. back to black, in the school’s opinion], then you don’t need to come to school. Feeling pressured and distressed, the girl effectively stopped attending classes, and the school subsequently removed her name from its classroom seating chart and student list.

But instead of seeing the school administrators on campus, the woman decided to see them in court, and in 2017 filed a complaint for the incident, asking for 2.2 million yen (US $ 21,250) in compensation.

Tuesday an Osaka district court issued its ruling, concluding that neither side was quite right. Presiding Judge Noriko Yokota recognized the school’s validity in establishing and enforcing rules relating to hair coloring, saying “Such rules have been established as having a reasonable and legitimate educational purpose, and maintaining student discipline is therefore at the discretion of the school. “ Yokota also said: “You can’t say that school was forcing [the girl] to dye her hair black, ”apparently taking the school’s word that the girl’s roots were black and administrators were only demanding that she return to her natural hair color.

However, school is not completely free. The court also ruled that the administration’s actions after the girl stopped coming to class, such as removing her name from the list and removing her desk from the class, were unacceptable, and ordered Osaka Prefecture to pay damages from 330,000 yen (US $ 3,190) to the woman.

The amount is far less than she asked for, and the lack of a legal conviction for the school insisting that her hair should be black is likely to leave the complainant less than satisfied, and her lawyer has expressed her disappointment that the court took at face value the teachers’ claim that the roots and natural color of the girl’s hair was black. This was likely a critical point of contention, as some educational organizations, such as the Tokyo Board of Education, now have policies prohibiting pressure on students with naturally non-black hair to dye them black. .

Meanwhile, Kaifukan says he has no plans to appeal the ruling and attempt to avoid the sanction altogether, and the school admits it could do more to gain understanding. students and their tutors regarding school rules. “We haven’t changed our standard for students who have dyed their hair to make it black, but this case has been a learning experience, and we will be thinking more about how to better guide our students.”

Sources: Mainichi Shimbun via Hachima Kiko, NHK News Web
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Japanese school renames boys ‘and girls’ uniforms to ‘Type I’ and ‘Type II’ as part of gender identity reform https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-renames-boys-and-girls-uniforms-to-type-i-and-type-ii-as-part-of-gender-identity-reform/ https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-renames-boys-and-girls-uniforms-to-type-i-and-type-ii-as-part-of-gender-identity-reform/#respond Wed, 23 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/japanese-school-renames-boys-and-girls-uniforms-to-type-i-and-type-ii-as-part-of-gender-identity-reform/ New dress code allows choice of stockings for female students only. Although the word uniform literally means “one form,” every day at a school in Japan you will see two different uniforms: one for boys and one for girls. For example, at Yokota Prefectural High School in Shimane Prefecture the boys ‘uniform has trousers, while […]]]>

New dress code allows choice of stockings for female students only.

Although the word uniform literally means “one form,” every day at a school in Japan you will see two different uniforms: one for boys and one for girls. For example, at Yokota Prefectural High School in Shimane Prefecture the boys ‘uniform has trousers, while the girls’ uniform has a skirt.

However, when the next school year begins in the spring, Yokota will no longer have boys ‘and girls’ uniforms. It is not because they will be wearing a unique and identical uniform that all students will wear, but because the school is rename them to Type I and Type II, as part of its evolving recognition of the diversity of gender identity.

For the 2021 school year, Yokota students will be able to choose between wearing a skirt or pants, and the school says a number of them have already expressed a desire to wear the latter. While some of these choices were undoubtedly driven by the greater warmth provided by long pants, Yokota made it clear that the main reason for bringing in the pants / skirts option was not the sadly classrooms. cold from Japan, but allow students to wear clothes that they feel good in tune with how they identify in terms of gender.

Yokota will become the 13th of 34 full-time prefectural high schools in Shimane to allow female students to wear pants. However, the freedom to choose between wearing pants or a skirt is not extended to the male student body. “At this point we are just changing the dress code [to allow students to choose] for students ”, said Kyoko Mitani, professor of humanities at Yokota. However, she added: “Given the different opinions of students and their tutors, I want us to keep thinking about gender diversity,” implying that the school could allow male students to wear skirts before. long time.

Source: Mainichi Shimbun via Yahoo! News from Japan via Jin
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This Japanese Under Amour x Kokuho school bag costs around RM3,429 and guarantees 6 years of durability! https://taipeijs.org/this-japanese-under-amour-x-kokuho-school-bag-costs-around-rm3429-and-guarantees-6-years-of-durability/ https://taipeijs.org/this-japanese-under-amour-x-kokuho-school-bag-costs-around-rm3429-and-guarantees-6-years-of-durability/#respond Sun, 06 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/this-japanese-under-amour-x-kokuho-school-bag-costs-around-rm3429-and-guarantees-6-years-of-durability/ Japanese brand Kokuho and Under Amour have collaborated and will launch the “Under Amour School Bags” for primary school students. Traditional Japanese school bags have around 100 years of history. Besides its high functionality, according to HAKO, the traditional Japanese school bag Randoseru also hopes to develop children’s abilities to take care of their possessions, […]]]>

Japanese brand Kokuho and Under Amour have collaborated and will launch the “Under Amour School Bags” for primary school students.

Traditional Japanese school bags have around 100 years of history. Besides its high functionality, according to HAKO, the traditional Japanese school bag Randoseru also hopes to develop children’s abilities to take care of their possessions, as well as to reduce the gap between rich and poor, because backpacks are common and inconspicuous.

The Under Armor school bag due out in March 2021 would carry the spirit of Under Armor and support students who will become high performance athletes in the future.

Equipped with a number of features that support student life in school, the satchel is sturdy enough to withstand six years of use. In addition, it is sized to hold an A4 flat file and is also easy to carry for elementary school students.

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The price of the customized model and the basic model of school bags are 88,000 yen (approx.3,429 RM) and 77,000 yen (approx.3,000 RM) respectively. According to Kokuho’s official website, they plan to develop four basic models and three custom models for school bags and will sell them at all relevant stores in Japan.

Would you buy them if these satchels were available in Malaysia? Let us know in the comments!

Read also: This lab-grown meat will soon be available in Singapore

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