Language school – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 01:30:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://taipeijs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-4-32x32.png Language school – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ 32 32 Plans for a new language school in Birkenhead https://taipeijs.org/plans-for-a-new-language-school-in-birkenhead/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 11:48:45 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/plans-for-a-new-language-school-in-birkenhead/ The proposal, put forward by Franklin Rios, will see the school operate on three floors of 14 Hamilton Square in the city. Short-term student accommodation for those taking intensive courses at the language school will be located on the upper two floors of the listed five-storey building. According to the planning statement, drawn up by […]]]>

The proposal, put forward by Franklin Rios, will see the school operate on three floors of 14 Hamilton Square in the city.

Short-term student accommodation for those taking intensive courses at the language school will be located on the upper two floors of the listed five-storey building.

According to the planning statement, drawn up by MPD Built Environment Consultants Ltd, this program “will be [breathe] a new life in the locality and restore productive use to a vacant historic building, which can only be beneficial for the vitality of the conservation area and the long-term maintenance of the listed building.

Indeed, the site is currently vacant, having served for the last time in a law firm.

Regarding the quality of the housing that would be provided, the press release added: “Considering the scale of the building, the interior layout offered to potential future occupants would be good, with generously sized rooms and large windows allowing sufficient perspectives and of natural light.

Students will not have private outdoor space to socialize, but the statement argues that given the short-term nature of accommodation, the public outdoor space in Hamilton Square itself is sufficient.

The planning firm also noted that Hamilton Square is within walking distance of the waterfront, where students could congregate.

Regarding the parking situation, the company said, “Paid and posted on-street parking is available in the surrounding streets and the property is close to bus stops and Hamilton Square train station.

“There is also a private paid parking lot posted at the rear of the property.”

Regarding the operation of the language school, the press release added: “The school will operate during the day and in the early evening with the possibility of some lessons on Saturday morning depending on demand.”


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This 35-year-old Six Nations language school in Ontario still awaits federal funding for its own home | Radio-Canada News https://taipeijs.org/this-35-year-old-six-nations-language-school-in-ontario-still-awaits-federal-funding-for-its-own-home-radio-canada-news/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 17:31:48 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/this-35-year-old-six-nations-language-school-in-ontario-still-awaits-federal-funding-for-its-own-home-radio-canada-news/ Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo Private School, a language immersion school on the Six Nations of the Grand River in Ontario, has been operating from the second floor of the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena for over a decade. It is the only school in Canada that offers the critically endangered Cayuga and Mohawk languages ​​from Kindergarten […]]]>

Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo Private School, a language immersion school on the Six Nations of the Grand River in Ontario, has been operating from the second floor of the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena for over a decade.

It is the only school in Canada that offers the critically endangered Cayuga and Mohawk languages ​​from Kindergarten to Grade 12.

As native speakers of Mohawk and Cayuga continue to disappear, the pressure for Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo to have adequate space to educate its students is urgent, according to school board members.

According to Six Nations language experts, there are less than 1,000 native Mohawk speakers and around 30 Cayuga-speaking people in the world, and some of them live in the Six Nations. They understand that their teachings, ceremonies and management of the country are all based on languages. Thus, saving them is intrinsic to the maintenance of Haudenosaunee culture and identity.

“[Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo] will restore what was lost as a result of Canada’s residential school system, ”said Ruby Jacobs, School Board Chair.

Over the years, many children have been taken from the Six Nations and sent to the nearby Mohawk Institute of Brantford, which was once Canada’s oldest residential school. Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo – which translates to words that sound good or good – effectively reverses much of the damage that residential schools have caused to Indigenous peoples.

The entrance to Kawenni: io / Gaweni: your private school is visible from outside the arena. School administrators charge around $ 15-20 million to build their own space. (Candace Maracle / TBEN)

“In my opinion, residential school syndrome is still happening today,” said Jacobs, referring to the impact of displacement on communities and stressing the importance of schools like Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo.

Yet on the federal government’s list of Indigenous schools on reserve to be built or repaired, Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo ranks 21st out of 40 schools in Ontario alone.

According to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), the main federal department that approves funding for these schools through the government Capital and maintenance program, the order of priorities is determined by several factors: health and safety; overcrowding; access to other educational institutions; and design requirements.

Kawenni: io / Gaweni: Your administrators say the school easily meets these requirements. They have also prepared a report that sets out its case for funding, finalized design plans, and continues to seek other funding opportunities, from private donors and government.

The school currently receives core funding from the ISC which covers running costs and staff salaries. However, according to school administrators, salaries are lower than those of the average teacher in Ontario.

They are now asking for around $ 15-20 million to build their own space, which would include a gymnasium, longhouse, library, space for the elders, a wing for nine elementary and primary school classrooms, and a separate wing for six high schools. Classes.

The proposed design would allow for a significantly higher number of students, an increase from the current 125.

Yet they are waiting.

“We have had many visitors from the federal government, education authorities, who are supposed to serve the aboriginal community,” Jacobs said. “They know the situation here.

The playing field near the arena can be seen. “This space was never intended to be a school,” says Dr Tehota’kerá: tonh Green, the director. (Candace Maracle / TBEN)

Matthew Gutsch, ISC media spokesperson, confirmed that “the Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo project is well positioned to take advantage of funding when it becomes available. He said via email that the SAI had visited and spoken to principals several times over the past few years and had recently supported the school’s request for separate funding from Infrastructure Canada, as part of the Green and inclusive community buildings program. This request is “under evaluation,” Gutsch said.

But as to new funding directly from the SAI or how the school can increase its priority ranking, Gutsch did not provide further details.

“The current demands for the construction of new schools exceed the resources available within the SAC; if the request of [Infrastructure Canada] be successful, ISC officials will be delighted to work with federal partners to move the project forward, ”he said.

The registration challenge

Given the school’s goals, one indicator of its success is enrollment. Yet Kawenni: io / Gaweni: you had to impose a ceiling of 15 students per class, because the current classrooms are small, thus limiting future language learners.

In addition, the current COVID-19 restrictions have halved the number of students allowed on the site, according to the school. Because classrooms also lack adequate mechanical ventilation, windows that open for ventilation, running water in classrooms and only have two bathrooms, which are shared by staff and the students, the Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo board decided that it was not safe to bring the students back to school there.

Last fall, with the return from work in person and the school’s classes still online, nearly 25% of students in Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo had to transfer to other schools in the area, most without language immersion. The 125 students they now have will establish funding for the 2022-2023 school year, according to its board of directors.

Green, the principal of Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo, says the arena space “was never designed to be a school and was remodeled to be a school.” (Candace Maracle / TBEN)

Dr. Tehota’kerá: tonh Green, Director of Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo, understands the challenges of enrollment.

He works in a small space within the school, above the arena. Outside, garbage littered the playground. Delivery trucks come and go. Half of the classrooms do not have windows and the concrete floors do not provide adequate heating or ventilation.

“This space was never intended to be a school and it was redeveloped to be a school,” Green said.

Tehota’kerá: tonh has devoted much of his life to the Kanien’kéha language, or Mohawk language. Her own children go to school and their first language at home is Kanien’kéha.

The richness, quality and depth of what they learn reflects who they are, who their families are.– Dr Tehota’kerá: tonh Green

Green witnessed the death of the last speakers of the Mohawk dialect in Tyendinaga, his home community, not so long ago, and he sees the same urgency in the Six Nations.

“The richness, quality and depth of what they learn reflects who they are, who their families are,” he said. “It reflects the practices of the community and maintains a vibrant culture, and to me, there is nothing more valuable than that. “

Promote pride in being Haudenosaunee

About 35 years ago the school was founded in a garage by a group of parents who saw an immediate need for their children to learn the language, and since then have been looking for a home.

Students were sent from one place to another because their school was doomed or deemed unsuitable.

Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo offers an immersion in Mohawk and Cayuga. (Candace Maracle / TBEN)

During this time, the school has developed its own unique approach to education.

The Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo board of directors decided that students would learn the Ontario curriculum and tsi niyonkwarihotens (our cultural responsibilities) simultaneously. Tehota’kerá: tonh said the purpose of the approach is that an education of Kawenni: io / Gaweni: yo would foster understanding and pride in being Haudenosaunee while preparing students for life after high school – a “Good life” in today’s difficult and complex context. , dynamic company.

The school’s graduates either obtained graduate degrees or returned to serve their communities.

Elva Jamieson is a founding member of the school. (Submitted by Elva Jamieson)

Kawenni: Elva Jamieson, founding member of io, sees it at her local longhouse.

“The graduates are running the show now. Having to bury people, funerals, vigils and our healing ceremonies – the elders depend on these young people to do it because they can’t do it anymore, ”Jamieson said. , also a teacher and practitioner of traditional medicine.

“Knowing the language teaches respect for all of creation,” she said of Mohawk and Cayuga cultural transmission.

Through tears, Jamieson reflected on their efforts to maintain languages ​​and asked, “How come we aren’t allowed to have a school like everyone else?” How is it that our children are at the top of an arena? They have to cross a parking lot. a lot to get to the playground. ”

A commitment to Indigenous languages?

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action 13-17 deal exclusively with Indigenous language and culture. They call on the federal government to “provide sufficient funds for the revitalization and preservation of indigenous languages”.

Not only are these calls to action not being met – on the eve of the launch in 2022 of the Decade of Indigenous Languages by UNESCO, which Canada has supported, but Green also points to changes throughout history that have limited the financial sovereignty of the community.

He said that in the 1830s Six Nations lands were leased to the British Crown, for which the Crown paid and held in trust, and the income from these leases was known as the Six Nations trust fund. or the Indians.

When Canada became a country and with the implementation of the Indian Act, the government began to limit the ability of the Six Nations Confederacy Council to allocate these funds in its own community.

Those funds could now be used to build the new school, Green said.

“We are not asking for anything that is not already ours.”


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Irish language school launches Christmas cards https://taipeijs.org/irish-language-school-launches-christmas-cards/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/irish-language-school-launches-christmas-cards/ A new Irish language primary school is using Christmas cards to help promote the use of the Irish language. The parents of Gaelscoil Áine in Mobhi Road, Dublin, use specially designed Christmas cards to spread the use of Gaeilge and raise funds for the school. “Wishing someone a Merry Christmas by saying nollaig shona helps […]]]>

A new Irish language primary school is using Christmas cards to help promote the use of the Irish language.

The parents of Gaelscoil Áine in Mobhi Road, Dublin, use specially designed Christmas cards to spread the use of Gaeilge and raise funds for the school.

“Wishing someone a Merry Christmas by saying nollaig shona helps keep the beautiful Irish language alive,” said Tarsila Krüse, children’s book illustrator and parent at the school.

Krüse has designed a series of Christmas cards (cartaí na nollaig) with Irish greetings which are sold to raise funds for the school.

She said she hoped the cards would help spread the use of the Irish language as well as holiday cheer.

“Irish language Christmas cards are generally hard to come by and I wanted to create a variety that would look cheerful and festive and would suit a wide variety of people,” the artist said.

Krüse, originally from Brazil but living in Dublin for nearly 15 years, is a renowned artist and children’s book illustrator whose work includes the covers of RTÉ Guide Christmas magazine in 2019 and 2020.

His illustrations can also be found in books such as My Little Album of Ireland, Percy Péacóg and the two award-winning Ná Gabh ar Scoil and CD book Bliain na nAmhrán.

“The cards are made to the highest quality standards and feature a cute fox and hare sitting under the stars on a log in the snow sharing a cup of hot chocolate,” she said.

“The cards cover different aspects of Irish culture at Christmas with both traditional and modern elements that look and feel welcoming.

“We’re selling these as a pack of ten cards for €10 to help Gaelscoil Áine raise money for important resources at school, although I also think it’s a sweet way to bring in some extra cash. Irish in people’s lives.”

Gaelscoil Áine opened in September 2019, providing parents with a new coeducational Irish-speaking school that is both multi-denominational and multilingual.

The school is under the patronage of An Foras Patrúnachta, a management body founded in 1993 to promote education through Irish.

The school is temporarily located in the third tier building of Whitehall College on Mobhi Road, Drumcondra, pending a permanent location.

It currently has 70 students with a huge demand for places in the school.

All proceeds from the sale of Gaelscoil Áine cartaí na nollaig will go to the school to fund much-needed educational resources, such as books and sports equipment.

You can buy the cards online from Shop in Ireland or from the Tarsila Kruse website.

Cards will also be sold at the National Botanic Gardens Dublin Outdoor Christmas Craft Market on Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th December from 10am to 4pm.

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Nk̓ʷusm Salish language school undergoing long-term renovation | New https://taipeijs.org/nk%cc%93%ca%b7usm-salish-language-school-undergoing-long-term-renovation-new/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/nk%cc%93%ca%b7usm-salish-language-school-undergoing-long-term-renovation-new/ Char-Koosta News ARLEE – The building and campus of the Nk̓ʷusm Salish language school are currently undergoing a facelift which will expand its facilities and make the school safer for its students. NSLS is located in the old Arlee Bowling and Bar building. The remodeling and upgrades of the old bowling alley and bar take […]]]>

Char-Koosta News

ARLEE – The building and campus of the Nk̓ʷusm Salish language school are currently undergoing a facelift which will expand its facilities and make the school safer for its students. NSLS is located in the old Arlee Bowling and Bar building.

The remodeling and upgrades of the old bowling alley and bar take place in three phases. The ground floor bowling area has two levels, an upper area and a slightly lower area which included the bowling lanes and the bowlers lounge area as well as a second floor with an office and a large rectangular classroom. .

The completed first phase, centered on the upper level of the bowling alley, included the construction of a new classroom. Carpet flooring has been removed throughout the school and replaced with waterproof laminate flooring.

“We are in the middle of phase two,” said Allen Pierre, cultural specialist at Nk̓ʷusm. “It will be a long road until the completion of this remodel – this is the fourth year. The tribes invested a lot of money in this, and we raised money through fundraising and grants. “

• The second phase is underway in the lower bowling alley area. It includes the construction of a new professional grade kitchen, spacious dining / meeting room and new washrooms. The current kitchen has always been too small and cramped with students too close to adhere to the new COVID protocols that the school is practicing.

COVID precautions are paramount at school, Pierre said.

Meals are prepared off-site in the kitchen at the Arlee Community Center and delivered in individual containers that are left on tables outside the classrooms. The students collect them and eat in their classrooms.

“COVID is eclipsing everything we do here,” Pierre said. “A lot of things in phase three require a lot of money. We can get a lot of the funds through COVID funding, and it helps a lot. “

There will be a new heating, ventilation and cooling system in the school with special COVID filters.

Concierge staff deep clean classrooms on Friday. Classrooms are cleaned / disinfected daily between student class changes by wiping down seats and desks, and thoroughly cleaned in the evening.

“The classrooms are set up so that students can socially distance themselves at three feet and we disinfect them by hand between lessons. Children wear masks and disinfect their hands a lot, ”said Pierre. “Once one of our students gets sick, they all stay home. We only had to do it twice this school year.

During both stops, students were given iPads for distance learning and were given breakfast and lunch twice a week.

Pierre attributes the low number of stops due to COVID precautions taken by the school. Recent COVID vaccinations for students ages 5 to 11 are an example of providing a safe learning and working environment for students and staff.

• The third phase includes: landscaping of the campus; improve the fence around the perimeter of the outdoor playground; new and / or donated playground equipment; sidewalks; new access doors with key ring; and new windows and a fire escape for the second floor.

“We will be upgrading the fence (north) that separates the tribal housing from the playgrounds so that there is no access to school property,” Pierre said. The only access to the playground / recreation area will be from inside the school building.

The Salish Kootenai Housing Authority donated the land in front of Nk̓ʷusm to be used as parking for visitors and staff, and a fenced enclosure for the Nk̓ʷusm bus fleet.

Pierre said the fenced parking lot is necessary to prevent vandalism and theft of gasoline.

Beyond the physical improvements to the Nk̓ʷusm plant, there are other desired improvements, the most important of which is the addition of a high school curriculum. It was a dream of the late Pat Pierre, a Salish language teacher at Nk̓ʷusm.

“Pat (Pierre) said his dream is to have a high school here, so ‘Someday when the kids come here they won’t have to go to public school. This is where children can find their identity that will forge who they are in life, ”said Pierre, remembering his father’s words.


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Portuguese language school to resume classes this month – the Royal Gazette https://taipeijs.org/portuguese-language-school-to-resume-classes-this-month-the-royal-gazette/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/portuguese-language-school-to-resume-classes-this-month-the-royal-gazette/ Updated: October 12, 2021 at 7:56 AM A Portuguese language school for children has recruited a new teacher. The Portuguese Cultural Association of Bermuda said Lidia Silvia, who taught the language in Bermuda for a year from her London home through Zoom, will move to the island. Richard Ambrosio, President of the PCA, said: “It […]]]>

Updated: October 12, 2021 at 7:56 AM

A Portuguese language school for children has recruited a new teacher.

The Portuguese Cultural Association of Bermuda said Lidia Silvia, who taught the language in Bermuda for a year from her London home through Zoom, will move to the island.

Richard Ambrosio, President of the PCA, said: “It has been very well received despite the education given in these difficult times.”

The Vasco da Gama club, which houses a Portuguese language school for young people (file photo)

Mr Ambrosio said the Portuguese school had to suspend its activities until the end of the last school year due to the Covid-19 pandemic and thanked former school teacher Veronica Franco, who has worked on the island for a decade, for his service.

He added: “Most of our fundraising for 2020 and 2021 had to be canceled, depriving the PCA of critical revenue.

“The main ones have been the Ag Show, the Kappa Classic, the Santo Cristo Festival, bake sales, fundraising dinners and football tournaments. “

Registrations for the Portuguese school are open and there are still a few places available.

This is an after-school program for grade 6 elementary students.

The school, located on the ground floor of the Vasco da Gama Club on Hamilton’s Reid Street, costs $ 500 per year per student, but the PCA said parents could pay in four installments of $ 125 due to the economic impact of the pandemic.

Classes should start next Tuesday, with Zoom first.

But the PCA said it hopes to return to class as soon as possible.

The PCA added that it was working on an adult language program and registration was due to begin shortly after Ms Silva arrived on the island.

Ms. Silva graduated in Romance Language and Literature, specializing in Portuguese and French, from the University of Madeira.

She then obtained a primary education diploma from the University of the Azores.

To register for courses or for more information, send an email to portugueseBDA.com.

Mr Ambrosio added that the PCA is a charitable organization and depends on public support to keep its programs running.

To donate, use Butterfield Bank, Portuguese School a / c 20006060707516100.


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Hispanic heritage: OKC launches the city’s first bilingual school https://taipeijs.org/hispanic-heritage-okc-launches-the-citys-first-bilingual-school/ https://taipeijs.org/hispanic-heritage-okc-launches-the-citys-first-bilingual-school/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/hispanic-heritage-okc-launches-the-citys-first-bilingual-school/ OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Oklahoma City’s very first bilingual immersion school opened this semester. Language is the foundation of learning at Western Gateway Elementary. Mom alleges her daughters were attacked in Norman High School, claims it could have been avoided “When we chose to live in this area, we were hopeful this school would open,” […]]]>

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Oklahoma City’s very first bilingual immersion school opened this semester.

Language is the foundation of learning at Western Gateway Elementary.

“When we chose to live in this area, we were hopeful this school would open,” said Kristen Adams, mother of a Western Gateway freshman.

Students who have chosen the bilingual stream spend 50 percent of the day learning in English and 50 percent of the day learning in Spanish.

“This is the best time to give them all we can give them,” said Vicky Montes, whose daughter Valeria is in first grade. “Children are taught in English and taught in Spanish, so they don’t lose what the majority of us do every day, which is speaking English. They get that added benefit of having the other language and having knowledge about other cultures that also speak Spanish. It integrates everything completely. It’s a good start !

There are 180 students at Western Gateway, enrolled in Pre-K, Kindergarten and Grade 1.

The plan is for the school to complete an additional year each year; possibly Pre-k to 4th.

In the fourth grade, many students will be fluent in English and Spanish.

“A second language will take you a long time in life,” said Valeria’s father, Sam Montes.

Adams hopes his son, Theo, will graduate from Western Gateway speaking fluent, or almost fluent, in both.
Spanish and English.

She wants her children to be ready to engage with people from a different culture.

While the program is taught in Spanish and English, there are also students who speak other languages, including Cantonese and Malay.

These students are on the way to becoming trilingual learners.

In Oklahoma City, the language barrier is relatively intact.

As the Spanish speaking south bank grew and prospered, the river remained a geographic divide.

Western Gateway is poised to bridge the gap, creating common ground south of downtown for English and Spanish speaking families to receive a great education.

“We had the southern community doing their thing and the northern community doing theirs. Western Gateway is a great example of how we can bring these communities together, ”said teacher educator Brittney Santos.

The student body is made up of 55 percent native English speakers and 45 percent native Spanish speakers.

Staff are bilingual.

There is an option for teaching in English only, but the majority of the school is immersion learning: math is taught in English; science and social sciences are taught in Spanish.

“We are working to build these classrooms as evenly as possible with native Spanish speakers and non-native Spanish speakers. So these peers can work together and learn from each other when they speak these two languages, ”said Heather Zacarias, Superintendent of Western Gateway.

Immersion education is decades old. The benefits are well documented across the country.

There are established immersion schools in Tulsa, but in Oklahoma City the idea has struggled to gain traction.

New residential construction in the Wheeler neighborhood has ushered in a new wave of optimism for bilingual education.

“It opens a lot of doors, internally, when you learn another language, you learn a different way of seeing things; a different point of view, ”Santos said.

The goal of Western Gateway is to empower students to communicate, connect and value differences.

Administrators hope the concept will catch on.

“We want to be a school that can be replicated, and you cannot replicate something that seems difficult,” Supt. Zacarias said.

Learning to speak, read and write in two languages ​​is a difficult task. It’s a skill that Spanish-speaking Americans have mastered for generations.

Today, in this space, young students from multiple cultures are valued for who they are, the language they speak and the language they learn.

If you want to enroll in Western Gateway Elementary, there are a few places available for Kindergarten and Grade 1.

The school prioritizes students who live within the boundaries of Oklahoma City public schools.

However, there are students enrolled from as far away as Blanchard, Oklahoma.

Apply online or call the registration desk at 405.276.9170.


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Illinois Wesleyan Universities Children’s Language School Hosts Language and Culture Festival https://taipeijs.org/illinois-wesleyan-universities-childrens-language-school-hosts-language-and-culture-festival/ https://taipeijs.org/illinois-wesleyan-universities-childrens-language-school-hosts-language-and-culture-festival/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/illinois-wesleyan-universities-childrens-language-school-hosts-language-and-culture-festival/ BLOOMINGTON, Ill. (WMBD / WYZZ) – On Saturday, the Wesleyan University of Illinois Children’s Language School hosted a language and culture festival on campus. Language school leaders have partnered with several community organizations to provide children with fun events such as arts and crafts, piñatas, and live music, with opportunities to learn about the different […]]]>

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. (WMBD / WYZZ) – On Saturday, the Wesleyan University of Illinois Children’s Language School hosted a language and culture festival on campus.

Language school leaders have partnered with several community organizations to provide children with fun events such as arts and crafts, piñatas, and live music, with opportunities to learn about the different cultures.

Carmela Ferradáns, director of the children’s language school, said the event had two purposes. The first is to bring the community to Illinois Wesleyan.

“The other goal, of course, is to celebrate the cultural diversity that we have in our community. It’s hidden, but we have it, ”Ferradáns said.

She pointed out that there are many ways for children to learn more about different cultures in the community, for example by enrolling in language school.

“We offer classes in French and Spanish from Kindergarten to Grade 5,” Ferradáns said.

Randi Sutter of the Normal Public Library said the event benefits the children who attended, as well as community organizations.

“It’s a great way for organizations to connect with each other and see how we can partner up and deliver more programs to our community,” Sutter said.

Ferradáns said seeing all the kids running around and having fun makes her smile.

“I’ve been here for 30 years teaching at Illinois Wesleyan, and it’s events like this that make me happy all around,” Ferradáns said.

Those who wish to enroll their child in the children’s language school can find more information on their website.


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A new language school steeped in encouragement and love https://taipeijs.org/a-new-language-school-steeped-in-encouragement-and-love/ https://taipeijs.org/a-new-language-school-steeped-in-encouragement-and-love/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/a-new-language-school-steeped-in-encouragement-and-love/ Sean Cook and Patrizia Amati are back in Laguna Beach to run Ciao Languages, their new online education service. By Barbara McMurray, Laguna Beach Independent Special “Well done, come by bene! (“Wow, how good you talk!”) Sean Cook heard this often as a young man fulfilling his postgraduate dream of living in Italy in the […]]]>
Sean Cook and Patrizia Amati are back in Laguna Beach to run Ciao Languages, their new online education service.

By Barbara McMurray, Laguna Beach Independent Special

“Well done, come by bene! (“Wow, how good you talk!”) Sean Cook heard this often as a young man fulfilling his postgraduate dream of living in Italy in the 1990s. No matter how hard his attempts at speaking are clumsy, absurd or unintentionally classified X, he found the Italian people infinitely generous and indulgent for their blunders.

“Love the language, don’t learn it because you need it for a job, for a certification, or because it’s good for your brain. If you love it, that’s enough. And don’t ever let anyone tell you. that a language is useless.

The lesson of effusive encouragement stayed with him. Fast forward nearly three decades, and Cook’s new Laguna Beach-based online language school, Ciao Languages, is rooted in positive reinforcement and empathy, which he sees as powerful motivators for doing more. efforts.

During his 27 years in Florence, Cook met and married his Sardinian wife, Patrizia Amati, in 2002, and had two sons, Jan, 14, and Thomas, 17. After working on a business plan for a few years, he returned to Florence. Laguna Beach with his family in mid-July. They enrolled the boys in Laguna Beach High School and now live next door to his mother and stepfather, Pam and Al Oligino. Together with a partner in Taiwan, Cook and Amati run the new family business. Amati also teaches Italian to her clients in person.

Cook has extensive experience in running language schools. In addition to working as an English teacher since 1994, he also owned and operated a foreign language school in Italy for 18 years. Although he does not consider himself a polyglot, he is fluent in Italian, speaks French and knows “a few sentences” in German and Japanese. He is currently studying Mandarin, naturally online.

Ciao Languages ​​courses – in French, German, Italian, Spanish and many more – are offered exclusively online via Zoom videoconferencing with native teachers. “The Ciao Languages ​​course catalog is constantly updated and is intended for frequent and recurring reference,” said Cook.

“We have a huge global network and can find any teacher for any language a student wants to learn,” he noted. “Our goal is to help students start to understand and speak a new language immediately. A variety of levels and timing options are offered so that students can learn on their own schedule.

Classmates Ciao, Cook said, interact online once or twice a week and congratulate each other. Services include assessment, access to digital and non-digital content, live online lessons with language coaches, and commentary to encourage and guide students as they progress to the speaker level. running.

The company only hires native speakers who share an enthusiasm for learners to be operational in their new language.

“We strive to make the online environment as human as possible,” said Cook. “We use modern teaching techniques with lots of useful slides that make the student talk as much as possible and practice as much as they can. We want students to have a real communication experience, so that they can express themselves in a foreign language.

Dismissing theories about the pragmatic benefits of being bilingual, Cook could be called a passionate purist for his belief in the only real reason for acquiring a new language: love.

“I love the language,” he said. “Don’t learn it because you need it for a job, for certification, or because it’s good for your brain. If you like it, that’s enough. And never let anyone tell you that a language is useless.

Getting his fledgling business off the ground means Cook is teaching again, even though he was used to a team of 14 when he sold his business in Italy. Two mornings a week at 5 a.m., he is now sitting at his computer, teaching English to a group of Taiwanese students.

Soon, he added, Ciao Languages ​​will unveil a partnership with a digital content provider that will provide students with more home practice opportunities and new ways to explore their love of the language. (ciaolanguages.com)


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Language school that provides resources and HOPE for hearing-impaired children seeing their first graduates https://taipeijs.org/language-school-that-provides-resources-and-hope-for-hearing-impaired-children-seeing-their-first-graduates/ https://taipeijs.org/language-school-that-provides-resources-and-hope-for-hearing-impaired-children-seeing-their-first-graduates/#respond Sun, 12 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/language-school-that-provides-resources-and-hope-for-hearing-impaired-children-seeing-their-first-graduates/ When he was 2 years old, Eli Stachofsky and his parents learned that he was profoundly deaf. “Ironically, my mom started to comfort the nurse because the nurse started to break down and felt a lot of compassion for my parents,” Stachofsky said. “My mom just felt a great sense of calm and was able […]]]>

When he was 2 years old, Eli Stachofsky and his parents learned that he was profoundly deaf.

“Ironically, my mom started to comfort the nurse because the nurse started to break down and felt a lot of compassion for my parents,” Stachofsky said. “My mom just felt a great sense of calm and was able to really comfort the nurse and say, ‘We’re going to be able to work our way through this. “”

The 19-year-old graduated from Spokane Valley Tech STEM Academy this summer. He was an athlete on the track and field team, wrestled and played football. Academically, Stachofsky excelled and recently entered a premedical program at Evangel University in Springfield, Missouri, where he has a dual major in biology and chemistry. In seven years, he will get his doctorate and hopes to become a family doctor.

None of this would have been possible without the Spokane Hearing oral excellence program, Stachofsky said.

The first preschoolers to attend Spokane HOPE graduate from high school in public school classrooms, a milestone for the language learning school that tries to develop the oral skills of deaf and hard of hearing children, and then to place them in the mainstream public school system as kindergarten children.

The main objective of the school: to teach deaf or hard of hearing children to listen, to speak and to be successful in any kindergarten class. HOPE sends 97% of its students to kindergarten, said Danette Driscoll, executive director.

“I was able to enter the mainstream public education system without any help,” Stachofksy said. “I was completely independent, I didn’t need anyone to help me… I felt as ready as I needed to be. I was in this class making friends, and no one really thought any different from me.

HOPE opened 17 years ago and is the only program of its kind in the region, Driscoll said. And it grows.

“Last year was the tipping point,” Driscoll said. “Last year was the first time we had to start turning away families.”

The school employs four teachers who are trained in the language skills of the deaf and hard of hearing. There is a part-time teaching assistant and speech-language pathologist, Driscoll said.

For the 2021 school year, they have 74 children, said Driscoll, a number that is growing every year. Most preschoolers have cochlear implants like Stachofsky.

From birth to age 3, HOPE teachers make hour-long home visits where they teach parents how to teach their child to speak.

When the toddler is ready, he goes to HOPE Kindergarten at 1821 E. Sprague Ave. It is there that he learns socialization skills and deepens what he has learned during the so-called “birth to 3” program.

Each teacher works with up to 30 families at one time and offers support to schools in the Spokane and Spokane Valley areas. Recently, the school has been asked to help more rural areas, Driscoll said.

Even after sending children to kindergarten classes, HOPE teachers register with families as they navigate the “main” school system, said Laurel Graham, an early intervention provider.

“We are also continuing this empowering role,” Graham said. “I have a parent who is nervous about his grandson going to preschool because he will be the first child to have cochlear implants, so we were just thinking about his son in particular. if he’s stressed. “

Parents also need to be familiar with the equipment and lingo that comes with the community, said Amy Hardie, director of education at HOPE.

Hardie said it’s so they can stand up for their own child when they enter school, often in a classroom where a teacher may not have that knowledge.

“It’s an important part of the process, so we have to make sure that our kids are defending their equipment themselves, and if they know their battery isn’t working, they can tell their friends,” Hardie said.

With modern technology, about 97% of newborns are tested for some kind of hearing loss, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Research has shown that early intervention is better for developing language skills. The skill-building techniques teachers give parents vary widely to meet the needs and goals of each family, Graham said.

About 52% of deaf children received education only through the spoken language, according to responses from the Annual Survey of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children and Youth. Only 3% were taught with sign language only.

Hardie said that language develops beyond the act of speaking; it is about visual cues and exposing the toddler to all sounds.

“There is so much more to teach parents when they are in their natural surroundings, and the sounds they make here and there,” said Hardie. “It teaches them bath time, diaper changes and meal times. We can work around their daily schedule to make language development easier and more natural for parents to teach their children the language.

As researchers in the hearing science community debate whether natural spoken language or ASL is better for a child, there is agreement on one thing: Children need to master at least one language, and they must learn it early in life.

Early fluency in a language makes healthy cognitive development in a child more likely, Hardie said.

Driscoll said cochlear implants, which the FDA approved in 2000 for infants as young as 12 months old, have helped places like HOPE serve children at a younger age, and thus increase their chances of learning a language. .

Children also develop a healthier attitude towards their implant, Driscoll said.

“All kids can see other kids with implants, and they think it’s normal,” Driscoll said.

Another challenge came in the form of a global pandemic that swept through the community in 2020 and forced schools like HOPE to transition online. For a school focused on hands-on learning and social interaction for children, the pandemic has been “really tough,” Hardie said.

Masks don’t help when trying to teach a child a language, Driscoll said, but she said it’s always better than distance learning.

Stachofsky said he would not have succeeded without the help of his HOPE teachers.

“My experience there was simply phenomenal. It really transformed the way I interact with the world, as I am today, ”said Stachofsky. “Without the HOPE School, I wouldn’t be able to be on the phone with you right now, listen to you and talk to you. Because the HOPE school was really able to implement the communication skills that I needed to, you know, fully function as a citizen of the world. So, yes, I owe it to the HOPE school and to my parents.


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ELI opens a new language school in Dublin https://taipeijs.org/eli-opens-a-new-language-school-in-dublin/ https://taipeijs.org/eli-opens-a-new-language-school-in-dublin/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/eli-opens-a-new-language-school-in-dublin/ I foundedn 2017 ELI offers English language training as well as a set of ancillary services including accommodation, airport transfers and tourist services for adults and adolescents all year round. It already operates two language schools in Ireland. “Vaccination rates should make Ireland one of the safest destinations to study” The new school will have […]]]>

I foundedn 2017 ELI offers English language training as well as a set of ancillary services including accommodation, airport transfers and tourist services for adults and adolescents all year round. It already operates two language schools in Ireland.

“Vaccination rates should make Ireland one of the safest destinations to study”

The new school will have 20 classrooms and will include student lounges with table tennis and a coffee dock. Its opening comes after the Covid-19 pandemic shut down large parts of the industry for 18 months.

Opening a big new school at the height of a pandemic, and while Ireland is still closed, may seem counterintuitive to many, ”said Peter Hutchinson, CEO of ELI.

“However, we are convinced that Ireland is in a good position. Vaccination rates are among the best in the world, which should make Ireland one of the safest destinations to study when we [Ireland] reopen.

“Ireland has long been a top destination for many, and Dublin is arguably one of the most exciting cities for young people,” he said.

Hutchinson argued that Dublin’s nightlife and the quality of the accommodation options would be a draw for students. He also said the Irish economy is “booming, with thousands of job opportunities for students”.

“As we emerge from the pandemic and some destinations remain closed, we hope Ireland will be seen as a quality and safe destination and 2022 will be a strong year of recovery for all,” he said.

ELI noted that more than 90% of adults will be fully immunized in Ireland by the time they open their new school and that the majority of existing staff and students are fully immunized.

“The industry is looking forward to the Irish Government’s next update on August 31st. when we hope that a roadmap for the return of international students will be announced, ”said ELI.


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