Language school – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 16:04:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://taipeijs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-4-32x32.png Language school – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ 32 32 Wailuku Hongwanji Japanese Language School Enrollment Is June 18 | News, Sports, Jobs https://taipeijs.org/wailuku-hongwanji-japanese-language-school-enrollment-is-june-18-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 16:04:55 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/wailuku-hongwanji-japanese-language-school-enrollment-is-june-18-news-sports-jobs/ Students interested in attending the Wailuku Hongwanji Gakuen (Japanese Language School) can register from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on June 18 at the Wailuku Hongwanji Mission at 1828 Vineyard St. The school, which begins Aug. 9, is open to students in kindergarten through grade 8 and teaches writing, reading, speaking, and folk […]]]>

Students interested in attending the Wailuku Hongwanji Gakuen (Japanese Language School) can register from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on June 18 at the Wailuku Hongwanji Mission at 1828 Vineyard St.

The school, which begins Aug. 9, is open to students in kindergarten through grade 8 and teaches writing, reading, speaking, and folk songs. Classes last 30 minutes and start at 3 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays and at 2 p.m. on Wednesdays.

Reverend Shinkai Murakami, the school principal, has created new programs for all students to experience Japanese culture, such as somen nagashi, mochi making, sushi making, calligraphy, spam musubi, origami, onigiri making, okonomiyaki and others.

The teachers are from Japan and will teach students with the standard Japanese language.

The registration fee is $50 per student. Monthly tuition is $80 for a member’s child and $85 for a non-member’s child. Textbooks and other learning materials can be purchased at the time of registration.

Students aged 9 and up who are learning Japanese for the first time will have a special class called “Wing 1” and will learn two levels in one year.

Bus services are available for elementary school students in Kahului, Wailuku, Waihee, Lihikai, Pomaikai, and Puu Kukui.

For more information, call Murakami at (808) 244-0406 or email shinkai528@gmail.com.




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DVIDS – News – MIS Language School moves to the Presidio of Monterey https://taipeijs.org/dvids-news-mis-language-school-moves-to-the-presidio-of-monterey/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 15:23:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/dvids-news-mis-language-school-moves-to-the-presidio-of-monterey/ by Lori S. Stewart, USAICoE Command Historian On June 11, 1946, the War Department moved the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS) from Fort Snelling, Minnesota, to the Presidio in Monterey, California. There it would evolve into the multilingual school known today as the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. MISLS began as the Fourth […]]]>

by Lori S. Stewart, USAICoE Command Historian

On June 11, 1946, the War Department moved the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS) from Fort Snelling, Minnesota, to the Presidio in Monterey, California. There it would evolve into the multilingual school known today as the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center.

MISLS began as the Fourth Army Intelligence School at the Presidio of San Francisco in November 1941. The school, commanded by Captain Kai Rasmussen, was established to teach the Japanese language primarily to American soldiers of Japanese descent second generation. In May 1942, when Presidential Executive Order 9066 ordered the relocation of all people of Japanese descent away from US coastal areas, the school moved to Camp Savage and then to Fort Snelling, both in Minnesota. During World War II, under the command of the current Colonel Rasmussen, MISLS trained approximately 6,000 people to serve as translators/interpreters for the United States armed forces in the Pacific theater.

After the war, MISLS continued to train Japanese linguists for occupation duties in Japan. At the beginning of 1946, however, the army was to leave Fort Snelling. After unsuccessfully pleading with General Douglas MacArthur’s Far East Command to assume responsibility for the school, Colonel Rasmussen sought another suitable location in the United States. He moved to the Presidio of Monterey, established in 1770 by the Spanish and used intermittently by the US military since 1847. It seemed like the perfect location for the language school. Not only was the weather nicer than the cold, biting Minnesota winters, it was closer to Japan, where most MISLS graduates would be assigned. Additionally, most of the school’s students and instructors had family returning to the West Coast after being interned in resettlement centers during the war.

On May 22, 1946, the Army announced the move of MISLS to the Presidio of Monterey on June 11, 1946 with First Class beginning July 15. Colonel Rasmussen, soon to take a posting as a military attaché in Norway, published MISLS Travel Circular No. 1 initiated the transfer to what he called “one of the finest posts in the army”. On June 8, the final class of 207 students graduated from Fort Snelling Institution. Shortly thereafter, the school’s 15 officers, 925 enlisted personnel and students, and its remaining civilian instructors boarded trains for California.

Arriving at the Presidio, Shigeya Kihara, who had been one of the first civilian instructors of the Fourth Army Intelligence School, recalled, “The Presidio was abandoned as an empty military post and the grass of was one meter high. And in the summer it’s foggy here in Monterey, and the fog horns were sounding. The buildings were all chipped with old, old paint. There was no suitable building for teaching. We were told to set up classes in abandoned cafeterias…”.

Despite the need for repairs and renovations, MISLS resumed Japanese lessons at the Presidio on July 15, 1946. Ten days later, Colonel Elliott R. Thorpe, who had served as MacArthur’s wartime counterintelligence chief , took command. Recognizing the realities of the early Cold War, Thorpe reoriented the school—renamed the Army Language School in September 1947—to teach a variety of languages, including Russian, Chinese, and Korean.







Date taken: 06.07.2022
Date posted: 06.07.2022 11:23
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Location: FORT HUACHUCA, Arizona, USA





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Okanagan Language School Teams Up With Industry Leaders | Company https://taipeijs.org/okanagan-language-school-teams-up-with-industry-leaders-company/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 15:52:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/okanagan-language-school-teams-up-with-industry-leaders-company/ A renowned Okanagan language school has partnered with industry leaders to present programs that benefit both employee-hungry companies and domestic and international students seeking rewarding careers. Established in 2002, International Gateway Kelowna continues to offer award-winning ESL courses and specialized English programs, as well as college diploma and certificate programs. “As employers struggle to recruit […]]]>

A renowned Okanagan language school has partnered with industry leaders to present programs that benefit both employee-hungry companies and domestic and international students seeking rewarding careers.

Established in 2002, International Gateway Kelowna continues to offer award-winning ESL courses and specialized English programs, as well as college diploma and certificate programs.

“As employers struggle to recruit and retain staff, IGK is trying to help fill that need,” said Blaine Melnyk, Director of Marketing and Recruitment in an interview.

Career programs provide hands-on training in courses lasting from six months to over a year.

Paid co-op placements with IGK business partners and college transfer credits are also available.

IGK works closely with the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce and welcomes the opportunity to expand cooperation with chambers in other Okanagan cities and towns.

Students receive training in their area of ​​interest while earning a co-op salary and have a high likelihood of a job awaiting them upon graduation.

Career colleges can quickly adapt to market needs and partner with industry leaders to develop programs that provide them with well-trained staff.

In addition to paid cooperation opportunities, IGK offers scholarships to local students, which helps make the price of professional training affordable.

To be eligible, local students must apply and be accepted by July 1, 2022.

These courses are a great way for young graduates, those who wish to change professional careers or re-enter the labor market or those who, within a company, are looking for specific training to acquire practical knowledge, explained Melnyk.

Students with a sense of connecting with people may wish to enroll in the Hospitality and Tourism Management Certificate, while those wishing to work alongside master winemakers may find the Winery Assistant and attractive sale.

Summerhill Pyramid Winery, Playtime Casino and BNA Brewing Co. & Eatery as well as Royal Anne Hotel and Predator Ridge Resort are among the

companies working with IGK on these certificate programs.

Certificate programs are also offered in User Interface Design for students interested in careers in mobile, voice, and web design and in User Experience Design for those interested in working in product and interaction design. .

The Cryptocurrency Professional Certificate provides the necessary foundation for blockchain applications, trade and investment, security practices, and smart contracts in the field of cryptocurrencies.

For students interested in careers in accounting, commerce, and marketing, the Business Administration degree provides a solid foundation of theoretical and practical knowledge in several related specialist areas.

Computer security analyst, systems security analyst, and security administrator careers await students who complete the cybersecurity degree program.

Over the past two decades, IGK has created an extensive network of international recruitment agents and immigration consultants.

Through this network, IGK works effectively with International Experience Canada offered by the Canadian government to secure work placements for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada or Canadian residents seeking work abroad.

“We receive requests from many international agents who have clients wishing to come to Canada. They first do an intensive English study program with us and then go to an employer for the next year or, in some cases, up to two years,” Melnyk said.

A group from Switzerland is currently completing the language program and will soon be employed.

IGK’s English language programs include those for general, business and academic needs, to meet language proficiency requirements and to prepare for college.

Programs for young students include ESL winter and summer camps that combine learning with outdoor fun.

For more information, visit www.igcanada.com or contact Melnyk at: info@igcanada.com or 250-868-4827.

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No funding for language school after minister’s visit https://taipeijs.org/no-funding-for-language-school-after-ministers-visit/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/no-funding-for-language-school-after-ministers-visit/ Parents and community members expressed their anger last week after a visit by the federal Minister of Indigenous Services produced little more than a speech about the community’s nearly 40-year struggle to obtain funding for a language immersion school. Last Wednesday’s visit by ISC Minister Marc Miller was heralded with much anticipation – as well […]]]>

Parents and community members expressed their anger last week after a visit by the federal Minister of Indigenous Services produced little more than a speech about the community’s nearly 40-year struggle to obtain funding for a language immersion school.

Last Wednesday’s visit by ISC Minister Marc Miller was heralded with much anticipation – as well as signs of protest – culminating in a stark announcement that he could not pledge any funding for a new school of Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo language immersion.

Parents and community members held signs comparing the state of the school and lack of funding to ongoing punishment reminiscent of the residential school days, when Indigenous children were forced to give up their languages ​​and learn English in boarding schools run by the church.

Students and staff have been learning in makeshift buildings around the reserve since the school was established in the 1980s.

Miller said he wanted to see the school built but couldn’t promise anything.

“We want this done,” he told about 150 people gathered in the parking lot of the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena last week, where students are currently learning in makeshift classrooms on the second floor of the building. ‘building. “We are here to see it done and this is the job I need to get back to my government and do it.”

Miller said supporting languages ​​and culture in Canada is a “high priority for this government,” but the money just isn’t there.

“That’s what we need to go back and finish. It is a project for which you have fought for a long time and for which I am only just beginning to fight. I am very aware of a request that is in progress to finance the building.

My government should focus on getting the funding you need to build a new school.

He told the group, “I can’t promise anything today. I think the worst thing that can happen is making false promises and not being able to keep them. This is something that I want to see happen and that has the attention of my government. I am ready to fight for it. If I could write a check today, I’d probably be a much more dangerous person than I already am.

However, everyone is looking for money in the same pot, as reserves across the country face vast underfunding in all walks of life.

“Your school is part of a process that is competitive in nature that is vastly oversubscribed,” Miller said. “I know those are hard words to hear. It’s something I want to see happen, whether through this process or another, and I bear the responsibility for that failure if it doesn’t happen. I’m not here to apologize. I hope to come back here in the future so we can have a brighter day. I recognize that language is life. It’s something close to my heart. »

He said he would work with Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo principal Jeremy Green and the school team to secure funding for new construction.

Land for a new building has already been designated adjacent to Six Nations Polytechnic on Fourth Line Road, and bids are currently being accepted for site servicing work on the property.

ISC has already approved the design construction.

They just need the funding now – up to $30 million.

Because of Covid, the cost per square foot has increased significantly from its previous estimate of $18 million, said school board president Ruby Jacobs.

“We believe that the education of these children’s education is the responsibility of the federal government,” she said. “These children have been going to school under these circumstances since 1986. Teachers and programming funding are also minimal.”

SAC funds the school’s annual operations to the tune of $4 million, but this number is expected to increase after the construction of a new school due to the size of the building and the increased number of staff and staff. students.

There will be a substantial increase in the number of families applying to attend the school, she said.

“They want this. It’s a small area that we have now.

About 120 students attend KG now. The new school could accommodate 300 or more students.

In light of the fact that the Canadian federal government has not announced funding for the construction of KGPS schools, Jacobs had words of determination: “That won’t stop us from continuing our crucial work of sustaining and revitalizing languages, culture, knowledge and the Onkwehon:we way of life. Nothing changes for us today. We will continue to do what we have done. Tenders have recently been launched for phase I of the construction and maintenance of the Kawenní:io-Gawęni:yo school site. We are proceeding as planned. »

If the federal government is funding the school, the KGPS Board of Directors will review all funding offers before accepting them to ensure that all requirements for receiving funding to build a school are consistent with the philosophy, the vision, mission and objectives of Kawenni. Private school:io-Gawęni:yo.

Green reiterated the need for support: “We encourage individuals, families, teams, businesses, entrepreneurs, associations, corporations, philanthropists and local, regional, national and international governments and organizations to donate. to our building fund. We thank those who have already donated. We also thank those who have helped promote and increase awareness of our situation – that we have no school. Our children matter. It is time for these children to have a school.

To get involved or donate, please email KGPS Director Jeremy Green at principal@kgps.ca, KGPS Board Secretary at kgboard@kgps.ca or call the school at (905) 768-7203 or by texting (519) 770-7233. Donations can be sent by check to the address at the top of the first page, by electronic transfer to buildourschool@kgps.ca.

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Language school connects local Chinese community to culture with help from Dal – Dal News https://taipeijs.org/language-school-connects-local-chinese-community-to-culture-with-help-from-dal-dal-news/ Fri, 20 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/language-school-connects-local-chinese-community-to-culture-with-help-from-dal-dal-news/ For nearly 30 years, the Halifax Chinese Language School (HCLS) has helped members of the local Chinese community stay in touch with their culture, language and traditions – supported in this quest by Dalhousie. Jinyu Sheng (right), Dal Professor in the Department of Oceanography and director of HCLS, co-founded the nonprofit school for university employees […]]]>

For nearly 30 years, the Halifax Chinese Language School (HCLS) has helped members of the local Chinese community stay in touch with their culture, language and traditions – supported in this quest by Dalhousie.

Jinyu Sheng (right), Dal Professor in the Department of Oceanography and director of HCLS, co-founded the nonprofit school for university employees and their families in 1993.

“I was a post doc at university, and we had several young families who were also employees working at the university and who had chosen to keep their culture and learn Chinese,” he recalls. “We didn’t have a school like that in Halifax, so we decided to start this kind of school. Not only teach Mandarin, but also math.

Over the years, Dalhousie has supported the school in many ways, including providing classrooms, security, and sometimes cleaning.

The school often draws as many as 120 elementary through high school students in a single weekend. Dr. Sheng estimates that about 50% of these students end up enrolling as future students at Dal.


Students are also offered mathematics courses as part of the HCLS. (Photo provided)

cultivate culture

For one student, Sean Wang, a medical doctor (MD) candidate in Dal’s Class of 2024, the experiences at HCLS have been invaluable.

“I attended the Halifax Chinese Language School for many years with my mother, Shuli Wang, as my teacher. There was not just classroom learning, but lots of concerts, musicals, dances, events, and most importantly, amazing food,” Wang recalled. .

“I didn’t understand the value of having school every Sunday. As I get older, I realize how wonderful it was to learn about my family’s culture.”

Patricia Lee Men Chin, a university lecturer in the Department of French, saw her two children attend HCLS for a few years.

“From a historical point of view, it is typical of Chinese immigrants to North America to establish Chinese language schools, mainly in Chinatowns, in order to preserve Chinese language and heritage. These schools are an integral part of the immigrant experience, and parents who volunteer to teach and organize activities provide an invaluable service to the community. I am grateful as a parent and faculty member that Dalhousie has been part of this community effort,” says Dr. Lee Men Chin.

Dr Lee Men Chin’s daughter Emma Leeshanok (pictured left) attended HCLS when she was a pre-teen. She is graduating with a bachelor’s degree in engineering and science from Dal next month and has already started working on her master’s degree in industrial engineering at the university.

“Coming from a family that didn’t immigrate directly from China, my parents don’t speak Chinese,” Emma explains. “I found the school to be great for giving me the chance to connect and engage with my ancestral culture in a way that I don’t think I could have otherwise.”


“I remember how happy and proud my son, Alex, was when he was able to write a complete sentence in Chinese on the board: ‘I’m coming to see my baby mama’,” recalls Dr. Lee Men Chin. (Photo provided)

Related Reading: Chinese Connections – Dal Hosts China Day

Global and local connections

While the school has realized much of its original vision over the past 29 years, Dr Sheng says it continues to find new ways to renew the Chinese cultural bond, including a summer initiative and online course.

“We have also organized several Root Seeking summer camps in a community in China. Thus, we have many students who join us to go to China during the summer to improve their languages,” says Dr. Sheng .

The school traveled with Root Seeking in 2008, 2010, 2013 and 2018, with an online camp in 2020 due to COVID-19.


A summer camp. (Photo provided)

The school also plays a prominent role in Halifax’s Chinese community.

“We have a very good reputation in the local community. We are also one of the co-organizers of the donation campaign to support the QEII Health Foundation during the time of the pandemic,” says Dr. Sheng.

While Dal began by donating two classrooms to the school in 1993, in 2020 the university was donating six classrooms to HCLS free of charge. Dal has since started charging a small fee.

“I would like to thank the university for over 29 years of supporting the school. I think the mutual benefit between the local community and Dalhousie is very important,” says Dr. Sheng.

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A new French-language school will open in Hamilton in 2024 https://taipeijs.org/a-new-french-language-school-will-open-in-hamilton-in-2024/ Wed, 11 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/a-new-french-language-school-will-open-in-hamilton-in-2024/ Hamilton will welcome a new French-language school on Rifle Range Road in the west end of the city. The school is part of efforts by the French-language school board, Conseil scolaire Viamonde, to attract more French-speakers to the area and meet the demands of those already there, said the board’s director of communications and marketing, […]]]>

Hamilton will welcome a new French-language school on Rifle Range Road in the west end of the city.

The school is part of efforts by the French-language school board, Conseil scolaire Viamonde, to attract more French-speakers to the area and meet the demands of those already there, said the board’s director of communications and marketing, Steve Lapierre.

The board serves central and southwestern Ontario.

“We currently have 56 schools in our territory…and this elementary school in the west end of Hamilton was a priority for the board.”

According to a press release, the school will create 271 places for primary school students, 49 new licensed childcare jobs and 3 new dedicated childcare rooms and is expected to open in September 2024.

Lapierre said he also received funding for a new building for Georges P. Vanier High School in partnership with the French Catholic school board.

“Our goal is always to get closer to the French community, where Francophones are established in Ontario, that is to say almost everywhere.

The Association canadienne-française de l’Ontario de la Hamilton region announced its support for the new establishment on Monday and thanked the provincial government for its commitment to the investment project in French-language schools in Ontario.

“However, many efforts will still need to be made to further increase access to services in French,” the statement read.

“Particularly in terms of access to culture and health care in French, which are essential for the development and sustainability of our Francophone community in Hamilton.

1 of 14 Welcoming Francophone communities

In May 2019, Hamilton was selected as one of 14 Welcoming Francophone Communities under the Government of Canada’s Action Plan for Official Languages.

The initiative provided funding to these communities across Canada to “create programs and activities to help French-speaking newcomers feel welcomed and integrated into Francophone minority communities.”

Through the program, $450,000 in annual funds have been made available to Hamilton from 2018 to 2023.

Other cities such as Sudbury, Calgary and Labrador City were also included.

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Carmel language school drops the word “Russian” from its name https://taipeijs.org/carmel-language-school-drops-the-word-russian-from-its-name/ Mon, 02 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/carmel-language-school-drops-the-word-russian-from-its-name/ The Indiana Heritage School/Multicultural Education Center, formerly the Russian School of Indiana, said the change better reflects the organization. CARMEL, Ind. – Indiana’s Russian School, which for decades operated as a language school, has dropped all ties to the country of its official name in a show of solidarity with Ukraine as the war continues […]]]>

The Indiana Heritage School/Multicultural Education Center, formerly the Russian School of Indiana, said the change better reflects the organization.

CARMEL, Ind. – Indiana’s Russian School, which for decades operated as a language school, has dropped all ties to the country of its official name in a show of solidarity with Ukraine as the war continues this summer.

The school will now be called The Heritage School/Multicultural Education Center of Indiana. School officials said the name change was part of a larger effort to show solidarity with Ukraine and would better reflect the lives of the multicultural families who attend the school.

“It’s not fair to our students and teachers who come from different cultural backgrounds. Some of them are Ukrainians, and it could be very tricky for them to be associated with a Russian school,” Irina said. Yoshida, a school administrator who teaches drama science and labs.

The decision to rename the school was one that school officials said they had already considered and did not take lightly, even before the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

“We felt like the name no longer represented who we are. And that’s been going on for a while. We felt like it’s a brand name but it doesn’t represent our mission,” said Natalia Rekhter, who is the chef. executive director of the new Heritage School/Multicultural Education Center of Indiana.

The school largely tried to steer clear of commentary on larger geopolitical conflicts or wars, Rekhter said, and focused on education programs intended to serve immigrant communities settling in Indiana, mostly from former Soviet republics like Belarus, Moldova, and Russia.

But when Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, administrators felt morally compelled to speed up that name change process.

“The situation, the war, changed everything. Because all of a sudden the name can not only distort who we are, but also distort our relationship with community members,” Rekhter said.

Rekhter published an op-ed about the name change in the Current in Carmel newspaper and said the organization received great support from the community in response.

“We feel morally obligated to express our vehement objection to the recent invasion of Ukraine by Russian forces. We stand with the people of Ukraine against Russian President Vladimir Putin, his regime and the invasion of Ukraine by the Russian army,” Rekhter wrote in the article. .

The Indiana Heritage School was founded in 1993 by a group of Russian-speaking immigrants. The Weisburd, Pekar and Kleyman families were Jewish refugees who fled persecution in the former Soviet Union and feared their children would feel disconnected from Russian culture living in the United States.

In collaboration with the Jewish Community Center, these families have started to organize language classes every Sunday to connect them to the culture. The organization grew over the years and moved to Carmel University High School.

Throughout this time, the community around the world has been fostered within the walls of the school and it continues to offer classes every Sunday. About half of the classes welcome children from homes where Russian is mainly spoken, but the students come from countries such as Canada, China or India.

The name change comes as several organizations across the country struggle to reconcile their Russian roots or influences amid the country’s ongoing war in Ukraine. Chicago’s Russian Tea Time restaurant reportedly considered dropping Russia from the name. A New York restaurant owner, who originally referred to her restaurant as Russian because she felt it would be more recognizable to Americans, changed the name to Ukrainian to accurately reflect her roots.

“We weren’t among the first because we wanted feedback from the community. We wanted to know from the community whether or not what we were doing was the right thing to do, even if we felt it was the right thing to do,” Rekhter said.

While heritage school officials have changed the name to better reflect the communities, they do not, Rekhter said, denounce their Russian heritage.

“The actions do not represent who all Russian citizens are. I would like people to remember this when they think of Russia and what is happening there. At the same time, unfortunately, the war is not not finished yet. I hope it will happen soon, but Ukraine will need a lot of help to rebuild the country,” Rekhter said.

RELATED: Ukraine: Kyiv attack was Putin’s ‘middle finger’ at UN

A name change isn’t the only way the nonprofit has said it’s supporting Ukraine. The Heritage School also offers free English classes for Ukrainian refugees in Indiana. The non-profit organization has worked closely with Indiana Supports Ukraine to provide basic necessities to people on the ground in Poland who have fled the country.

Watching the war unfold from Indiana hurt Russian and Ukrainian families affiliated with the school, said Richter, whose cultures had been intertwined for decades.

“It’s so painful. It’s so close to home. So of course we will support Ukraine. We will try to do everything we can,” Rekhter said.

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Landlord denies threatening to change language school locks – The Irish Times https://taipeijs.org/landlord-denies-threatening-to-change-language-school-locks-the-irish-times/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/landlord-denies-threatening-to-change-language-school-locks-the-irish-times/ The owner of a Dublin-based premises which houses a language school with more than 600 students has strongly denied before the High Court that he ever threatened to change the locks on the building. Late last week, Liffey College Principal Mr Haseeb Ahmed won a temporary High Court injunction against Paul and Gerard Dormer. They […]]]>

The owner of a Dublin-based premises which houses a language school with more than 600 students has strongly denied before the High Court that he ever threatened to change the locks on the building.

Late last week, Liffey College Principal Mr Haseeb Ahmed won a temporary High Court injunction against Paul and Gerard Dormer.

They are the owners of the premises in Maltings Business Park, Marrowbone Lane, near Cork Street in Dublin 8, from where the school operates.

Mr Ahmed sought the injunction over fears that due to a rent dispute the landlords intended to change the locks on the building.

Such a decision would have prevented students, most of whom come from abroad, and staff from accessing the school.

When the case returned to the High Court on Tuesday, Judge Senan Allen was told by one of the owners, Mr Paul Dormer, that he was prepared to give a pledge to the court not to change the locks.

Representing himself in the proceedings, Mr. Dormer added that he had never threatened to change the locks on the building.

He said an email was sent on behalf of the owner to the defendant at the end of last week confirming that the locks would not be changed.

Represented by Ronnie Hudson Bl, Me Ahmed claims that the school rents the first floor and the attic of the premises on foot for a lease of four years and 10 months for an annual rent of €160,000.

Rent arrears have accumulated, but the applicant claims that they are being settled.

Mr Ahmed says trouble arose after he was told the premises had gone into receivership.

The owners dispute the validity of the receivership and have brought proceedings in the High Court against the financial institutions that appointed the receivers.

As a result of the dispute, Mr. Ahmed said the college paid rent and arrears into his attorney’s account pending the outcome of this case.

The lawyer said the owners were unhappy with this position, and it is their case that the owners had threatened to change the locks.

This resulted in the request for a temporary injunction.

On Monday, Mr Dormer acknowledged that High Court proceedings had been initiated challenging the validity of the receivership.

Judgment in this case is awaited, he said.

However, he said significant rent arrears, some €80,000, had accumulated with the school.

He said no threats had been made to change the locks and that while he was happy to commit, he saw no reason why he should pay the legal costs incurred by Mr Ahmed for seeking the ‘injunction.

Judge Allen, in adjourning the case, accepted the recognizance offered by the defendants in lieu of the temporary injunction.

The judge said it was not possible at this stage to comment on the legal costs of the case.

The judge reserved the question of costs for a later stage of the proceedings.

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Minister: Estonian language school will help refugee children learn the language | Opinion https://taipeijs.org/minister-estonian-language-school-will-help-refugee-children-learn-the-language-opinion/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 12:18:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/minister-estonian-language-school-will-help-refugee-children-learn-the-language-opinion/ To date, more than 11,000 minors have fled to Estonia after the war in Ukraine, of which more than 3,000 are already enrolled in the country’s education system. The Ministry of Education and Research believes that children coming from Ukraine should first and foremost be offered places in Estonian language kindergartens or schools. Why is […]]]>

To date, more than 11,000 minors have fled to Estonia after the war in Ukraine, of which more than 3,000 are already enrolled in the country’s education system. The Ministry of Education and Research believes that children coming from Ukraine should first and foremost be offered places in Estonian language kindergartens or schools. Why is this so important? The answer is simple: because it is significantly faster and easier to learn the language in Estonian language kindergartens and schools.

The majority of Ukrainian children – over 68% – have started attending Estonian-language educational institutions, but 20% of refugee children attend Russian-language kindergartens and schools. Currently, barely 11% of children enrolled are in immersion classes.

Early immersion plays an important role in children’s language learning. An analysis of standardized test results for Estonian as a second language indicated that those who learned the language through early immersion programs performed significantly better than regular learners. For example, almost 75% of students in the early immersion group reached level A1, compared to only 25% of those who follow the so-called regular method.

I welcome the decision of the city of Tallinn to quickly create an immersion school for Ukrainians, where 60% of teaching is done in Estonian and 40% in Ukrainian. I believe we will soon have a great example based on the Ukrainian Immersion School of how to effectively learn the national language while preserving one’s own mother tongue.

Unfortunately, it is more likely that in Russian-speaking educational institutions, war refugees do not acquire the Estonian language sufficiently. We have data from recent standardized tests in 4th and 7th grade classes of Estonian as a second language in Russian-speaking schools. The results are staggering: only 40% of 4th graders were able to reach A1 or beginner level, and 19% can speak at A1 level.

The situation is no better at the 7th grade level ⁠—only 44.2% of students’ Estonian language skills are at elementary or A2 level; only 20% are able to express themselves verbally in Estonian at this level. And these are young people who have been studying the Estonian language for seven years.

According to the latest final exam results, only slightly more than half of pupils in Russian-speaking schools speak Estonian at B1 level at the end of basic school [9th grade], and 61% of graduates reach level B2 at the end of high school. Friends, we have a serious problem.

For the first time, we began to investigate under public supervision why children do not learn the national language in Russian-language schools. One reason is clear: we have nearly 2,000 teachers in our education system whose national language skills do not meet the requirements.

For example, there are 1,090 teachers in general education schools who do not meet the language requirements and 683 teachers in kindergartens. In addition, the language skills of eight school directors do not meet the requirements, as well as those of 19 kindergarten directors.

The Language Board issues warnings, sends people for training and possibly imposes fines, but the majority of them still consider that knowledge of the national language is not important enough to bring about changes in their lives. For years, we’ve been understanding and kind about it. We can’t keep doing this anymore.

All teachers standing in front of a class must speak the national language. Teachers are role models. If a teacher considers it unnecessary to speak the national language, why expect their students to?

Thus, in order to ensure that war refugee children who have arrived in Estonia can learn our national language as quickly as possible, it is important that they spend time in an Estonian-speaking environment.

Families who fled the atrocities of war naturally hope to return to their homeland as soon as possible in order to rebuild their country. Considering that more than 1,000 Ukrainian educational institutions suffered significant damage during the hostilities and entire cities were bombed, we must be prepared for the fact that war refugees will have to stay here with us longer.

Let us strive to provide children and young people from Ukraine with quality education in the Estonian language. When the war ends and they return to rebuild Ukraine, these young people will definitely have received a good education, found new friends and learned a new language in Estonia. And Estonia will have won friends in Ukraine.

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A language school obtains a temporary injunction preventing the owners from changing the locks of the premises https://taipeijs.org/a-language-school-obtains-a-temporary-injunction-preventing-the-owners-from-changing-the-locks-of-the-premises/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/a-language-school-obtains-a-temporary-injunction-preventing-the-owners-from-changing-the-locks-of-the-premises/ OPERATOR A language school with more than 600 students has won a temporary High Court injunction preventing its owners from changing the locks on its Dublin-based premises. The injunction was granted, on an ex parte basis, this evening by Judge Paul Burns in favor of Haseeb Ahmed, who is the principal of Liffey College. The […]]]>

OPERATOR A language school with more than 600 students has won a temporary High Court injunction preventing its owners from changing the locks on its Dublin-based premises.

The injunction was granted, on an ex parte basis, this evening by Judge Paul Burns in favor of Haseeb Ahmed, who is the principal of Liffey College.

The college says it rents premises at Maltings Business Park, Marrowbone Lane, off Cork Street in Dublin 8 from Paul and Geard Dormer.

The court heard that Ahmed feared landlords would change the locks on the premises before the school reopened after the Easter holidays on Monday morning amid a dispute over rent payment.

In a sworn statement to the court, Ahmed said that in a meeting last month, the landlord threatened to change the locks on the building without notice.

However, the court was told during the hearing that an email received by Ahmed’s lawyers shortly after the claim began, denied that such a threat had been made by the owners.

Seeking the injunction, Ronnie Hudson Bl for the plaintiff said that despite the content of the email, his client remained very concerned that college students and staff would not be able to access the premises on Monday morning.

The lawyer specified that his client occupied the 1st floor of the attic of the premises at the foot of a lease concluded for four years and 10 months with the owners in 2019 for an annual rent of €160,000.

The court heard that arrears had accumulated, but the plaintiff claimed the arrears were being cleared.

Problems arose after the premises were placed in receivership, leading to High Court proceedings between the owners and the financial institutions who appointed the receivers.

Arising from what is claimed to be the ambiguous situation, Ahmed said rent and arrears were deposited into his lawyer’s account pending the outcome of this case.

The lawyer said that the owners were not happy with this proposal and threatened to change the locks and prevent his client and college students who came from abroad to attend the school, to have physical access to premises.

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The defendants’ attorneys said they had no right to change the locks.
The lawyer said assurances had been sought from the owners that the locks would not be changed until Monday, but said none had been given.

Judge Burns said he was “very reluctantly” prepared to grant a temporary injunction against the defendants.

The judge noted that the dispute had been “simmering” for some time.

The judge said he was “less than impressed” by the correspondence between the parties, which should have been “much clearer”.

Given the circumstances, he was content to put an injunction preventing the locks from being changed until Tuesday, when the case will return to court.

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