School system – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 15:26:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://taipeijs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-4-32x32.png School system – Taipei JS http://taipeijs.org/ 32 32 Construction projects, improvements on track for the school system https://taipeijs.org/construction-projects-improvements-on-track-for-the-school-system/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 15:26:04 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/construction-projects-improvements-on-track-for-the-school-system/ Multipurpose sports building The multipurpose sports building will house a basketball court, locker rooms, restrooms and a state-of-the-art weight room that students can use during the day for strength and conditioning classes and student-athletes can use after school. The building sits between the high school, performing arts center, gymnasium and press room, making it a […]]]>

Multipurpose sports building

The multipurpose sports building will house a basketball court, locker rooms, restrooms and a state-of-the-art weight room that students can use during the day for strength and conditioning classes and student-athletes can use after school. The building sits between the high school, performing arts center, gymnasium and press room, making it a unique challenge to navigate, Bennett said.

Construction of the multipurpose sports building is well underway at Dawson County High School and is expected to be completed in the first three months of 2023. (Photos courtesy of Dawson County School System)

“I’m sure a lot of people saw the crane that had to lift all the steel structure and all the pieces above the gymnasium into place,” Bennett said. “Many school systems, if they had built this, would have put it in a parking lot somewhere or moved it away from school, but for our students, this was the best place for it to be used at the maximum and so that’s where we put it even though it was a little more awkward in the construction.

Currently, Bennett said the steel frame is nearly complete, the walls are in progress, and the electrical and plumbing is about 15 and 40 percent complete.

“They poured the second floor, the first floor ceiling and the second floor floor, so that’s good,” Bennett said. “It seems to move really really fast; it is very effective. We had cooperating weather conditions and we are making tremendous progress on this facility.

When completed, the multipurpose sports building will provide a plethora of opportunities for students that the school was previously unable to provide.

“It gives our teams the flexibility to not practice so late at night, to have additional meeting spaces or practice locations if you are an outdoor sport – so if baseball has to pitch and qu ‘It’s windy and it’s raining and everything else, they have a place they can come in and throw,’ Bennett said. “It also gives certain sports like cheerleading and wrestling a place to train rather than sharing a gymnasium at the same time. And the weight room will help all of our athletes and students who are not necessarily athletes but are also taking a weight training course.

Multi-purpose building 2.jpg

Construction of the multipurpose sports building is well underway at Dawson County High School and is expected to be completed in the first three months of 2023. (Photos courtesy of Dawson County School System)

The project is currently on track for completion in the first three months of 2023.

Roger D. Slaton Agri-Science Center

The Roger D. Slaton Agriscience Center, named for the late Dawson County School Board member Roger Slaton, is also well underway, Bennett said.

“It will start moving a little faster even though it started a little later because it’s being taken apart and put together,” Bennett said.

Currently, the asphalt and paving are complete and the steelwork is in place, and crews are working on the concrete block walls, he said. Electrical and plumbing work is approximately 25% complete.

When complete, the Agri-Science Center will greatly expand opportunities for high school agriculture courses. It will house classrooms and a show barn, and the center will also include a pasture area to provide dedicated space for the animals to spend time outdoors.

“The AgScience center will open up a lot more opportunities for classes, we’ll be able to put on shows, house more animals, and have a better teaching environment for our agriculture classes,” Bennett said. “With the state of Georgia approving elementary school agricultural science education, we expect this program to continue to grow.”

AgScience Building 1.jpg

Construction of the Roger D. Slaton Agriscience Center is well underway at Dawson County High School and is expected to be completed in the first three months of 2023. (Photos courtesy of Dawson County School System)

Like the multipurpose sports building, the agroscience center is also on track for completion between January and March 2023.

That both projects are on track, Bennett said, is due in part to the school system and builders being proactive in getting materials and supplies ahead of time.

“The good thing is we’re on top of things – even though the US and the world sometimes lags behind, we get everything we need in time to be proactive and take the next step. of the project,” Bennett said.

Standard Building Upgrades

In addition to the two major construction projects, the system is also working on a third project: the maintenance of school buildings in view of the return to school this fall.

“We have the standard maintenance of our school buildings, so we are working on the floors, the new painting, the preparation of the classrooms, the installation of new technologies in the classrooms, the installation of new radios, a lot things like that – and we’re fine with that,” Bennett said.

New floors, moving away from the old floors that needed to be waxed, are being installed in the classrooms, and painting is also underway. During the “dead period” for athletics around the week of July 4, wooden basketball floors will be refinished and sealed so they can harden and dry for basketball practices and practices. and volleyball.

“A lot of standard things are going well and I would like to give a lot of credit to Everett Burt and all the guys that work for him; he has a team of seven guys and he runs the facilities,” Bennett said. “And Vickie Pafford is our administrative assistant in this department; they did a great job making sure everything was planned and on time and got everything done.

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Troup County School System Concludes Summer ESOL Academy https://taipeijs.org/troup-county-school-system-concludes-summer-esol-academy/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 15:15:50 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/troup-county-school-system-concludes-summer-esol-academy/ TROUP COUNTY, Georgia (WRBL) – The Troup County school system concluded its annual English to Speakers of Other Languages ​​(ESOL) summer academy. The academy consists of three intensive weeks focusing on reading, writing, listening and speaking in English. Dr Jacqueline Jones, director of student services at TCSS, said the academy meets with each student at […]]]>

TROUP COUNTY, Georgia (WRBL) – The Troup County school system concluded its annual English to Speakers of Other Languages ​​(ESOL) summer academy. The academy consists of three intensive weeks focusing on reading, writing, listening and speaking in English.

Dr Jacqueline Jones, director of student services at TCSS, said the academy meets with each student at their level and assesses how to support them through remediation.

“In Troup County we have families who speak 22 different languages ​​starting with Spanish, we have the most children who speak Spanish. We have many children who speak Korean, it’s our second language and then we are everywhere. You know, Gujarati, Punjabi, we are everywhere. Our families come from many different countries. We have an English immersion program, and we also have different software that can meet the needs of our non-English speakers,” said Dr Jones.

She said the academy is offered to all ESOL students during the school year; however, it is open to all K-5 students who wish to attend. There are an average of 70 students attending each year.

Students follow a schedule that resembles a half school day during the school year. Transportation, breakfast, and lunch are provided, and students are taught for approximately three hours per day.

According to Dr. Jones, the greatest impact of the academy on students is to increase their comfort level in speaking. Students often become more confident throughout the summer and will speak more English by the end of the three weeks.

Olivia Abarra, is a kindergartener at TCSS and she is a native Spanish speaker. She appreciates the software learning program available to students. She said her teacher helped her and she enjoyed playing games while learning the alphabet.

“She helps me do all my homework and my ABC work, and then she helps me with kindergarten and she helps me be a first grader,” Abarra said.

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School system ‘failing’ on multiple fronts – report https://taipeijs.org/school-system-failing-on-multiple-fronts-report/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/school-system-failing-on-multiple-fronts-report/ The education system is “failing” on several fronts, according to a new report. The Times Education Commission has found that UK education is “failing on all measures”, with more than half (59%) of parents of school-aged children believing that schools are not preparing pupils for life while that 60% believe that it does not prepare […]]]>

The education system is “failing” on several fronts, according to a new report.

The Times Education Commission has found that UK education is “failing on all measures”, with more than half (59%) of parents of school-aged children believing that schools are not preparing pupils for life while that 60% believe that it does not prepare them for work.

A poll also found that the majority of parents (65%) think the current school system places too much emphasis on exams, with more than half (56%) saying it was bad for students’ mental health, in a survey of 1,993 parents in April 21 -22.

The Commission’s report also finds that there are ‘shocking’ regional disparities in the performance of early years pupils, with a primary school principal in Nottinghamshire reporting that some children arrived at school unable to say their own name and that 50% of their pupils at reception and in the crèche were not clean.

The principal said four-year-old students communicated their need to drink by saying “bot-bot” and that their school had to employ orderlies just to change nappies.

The commission also heard reports of “three-year-olds unable to walk properly because their muscles had not developed after days of sitting in front of the television and of five-year-olds speaking with an accent American, mimicking the cartoon characters they had been”. watching”.

Lee Elliot Major, professor of social mobility at the University of Exeter, told the commission that inequalities in the system were “persistent” and “glaring” before the pandemic.

“The pandemic has exacerbated and exposed inequalities that already existed,” he said.

The Commission calls on struggling parents to receive more help to ensure that all children are ready for school, including parenting classes, home visits and drop-in centres, alongside a public information campaign, similar to the “five a day” initiative on healthy eating, to emphasize the importance of talking and playing with your child.

Teachers should have more training on how to identify pupils with special educational needs, according to the commission’s report (Danny Lawson/PA)

He notes that only 75 “family homes” have been set up by the government while around 1,000 Sure Start centers have closed.

The Commission says that while the pandemic has been a “catastrophe” for young people, both in terms of mental health and widening the disadvantage gap, “the flaws in our education system predate the pandemic”.

The year-long project, chaired by Times columnist Rachel Sylvester and backed by 22 commissioners from various fields, as well as two former prime ministers and 13 former education secretaries, calls for a ‘British Baccalaureate’ offering a wider range range of university degrees. and vocational qualifications at 18, with a set of ‘lite’ exams at 16 as opposed to GCSEs.

The Commission is also calling for a ‘choice bonus’ for all schools to fund drama, music, dance and sport, as well as a national citizenship service experience for every pupil to ensure that the most poor can access outdoor expeditions and volunteering.

Undergraduates should be able to earn credit for their degrees through student tutoring to help them catch up, as this would be ‘better and cheaper’ than the current National Tutoring Program model.

“For the gap between rich and poor to be closed, tutoring will have to become a permanent fixture,” the report says.

“The government has recognized this, but the £5billion national tutoring scheme, set up after the coronavirus crisis, has been expensive, mismanaged and fails to help the most disadvantaged.”

The Commission says a new cadre of elite technical and vocational sixth graders with links to industry should be created, in line with government plans to open academically selective sixth graders under the upgrading scheme. level.

And it calls for increased early years funding, with unique pupil numbers linked to each child from birth to ensure they receive the targeted support they need.

The report also recommends that every child should have access to a laptop or tablet and that counselors be employed in every school.

Teachers should have more training on how to identify students with special educational needs, while schools should remain responsible for the students they exclude.

The report argues that the Ofsted school inspectorate should be reformed to work more collaboratively with schools, while a new ‘school report card’ should be introduced to assess school performance across a wider range of parameters, including the school inclusiveness and student well-being.

Fifty new universities are expected to be established in higher education “cold spots” and poorer parts of the country, with satellite wings in higher education colleges and a system of transferable credits between universities and colleges. , recommends the commission.

He adds that a 15-year education strategy would prevent every education secretary from starting from scratch to put schools “above short-term partisan politics”.

Former Prime Minister Tony Blair told the commission: “We must refocus on education as a key priority to build a better, more prosperous and more united country over the next decade.”

Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: “We have a good education system that works very well for many students and is delivered by extremely talented teachers and leaders in our schools and colleges. .

“However, the current system is not working as well for around a third of our young people, many of whom are disadvantaged or have special educational needs, and whose results do not offer them the best chance in life.

“The government’s emphasis on highly academic, high-stakes exams has created a cliff edge for too many young people.

“It must be reformed alongside improved funding for schools and colleges to support the children most in need of extra help, investment in crucial early childhood education and action to tackle against the scourge of child poverty.”

A spokesperson for the Department for Education said: ‘We thank the Times Education Commission for its report and always welcome new ideas and opinions from industry and education experts.

“Our Schools White Paper sets out a clear roadmap for improving education in England, including targeted support both for individual pupils who are falling behind and for whole areas of the country where standards are highest. weak, as well as ambitious targets to improve the standard of pupils by the end of primary school and GCSEs.

“Our ambitious Education Recovery Program is already getting children back on track after the pandemic, with the groundbreaking National Tutoring Program delivering nearly two million high-quality lessons to children and young people who need them most, as well as additional funding for schools. to be used to provide additional personalized support to students.

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Activists demand equity oversight in the school system https://taipeijs.org/activists-demand-equity-oversight-in-the-school-system/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:45:07 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/activists-demand-equity-oversight-in-the-school-system/ By Maggie Macintosh Journalist of the Local Journalism Initiative A coalition of anti-racism educators and advocates is calling on the Stefanson government to commit to both creating a K-12 Equity Secretariat and supporting the development of satellite offices within local school divisions. Equity Matters, which represents more than 80 Indigenous, newcomer and inner-city community organizations, […]]]>

By Maggie Macintosh

Journalist of the Local Journalism Initiative

A coalition of anti-racism educators and advocates is calling on the Stefanson government to commit to both creating a K-12 Equity Secretariat and supporting the development of satellite offices within local school divisions.

Equity Matters, which represents more than 80 Indigenous, newcomer and inner-city community organizations, is hosting a press conference today to unveil its pledge initiative.

The group called on every provincial political party — the Progressive Conservatives, the New Democratic Party and the Manitoba Liberals — to formally endorse the creation of a new equity infrastructure in the public school system with an official signature.

“If we’re serious about making real change and we want to address inequalities within (public schools), looking at the structural inequalities that currently exist, then we don’t just need to talk, we need to walk,” he said. Suni said. Matthews, co-chair of Equity Matters.

Ontario recently created a so-called Education Equity Secretariat to identify and eliminate discriminatory practices, systemic barriers and biases in its schools.

Matthews, a retired teacher, and her colleagues want Manitoba to follow suit.

The coalition has called on the province to create a designated secretariat to undertake research and develop equity-based policies, create inclusive curriculum guidelines, and provide workers with education anti-racism training.

Accountability should be embedded in the office, Matthews said, adding that community members want the province to measure and monitor systemic racism by collecting annual equity data from school divisions.

Signatories to the Coalition Pledge will commit to enshrining the Secretariat in the Public Schools Act and appointing an Assistant Deputy Minister of Education to lead the office.

The agreement requires the secretariat to be launched by September 1, 2023.

Equity Matters expects the office to publish an annual report on its progress once it is operational.

“Concrete and genuine change comes from addressing deep-seated systemic issues of colonialism and racism; engage in difficult conversations; and be transparent and accountable to the community,” campaign co-leaders Matthews and Crystal Laborero wrote in individualized letters prepared for political leaders.

The duo contacted Education Minister Wayne Ewasko, NDP Leader Wab Kinew and Dougald Lamont, Leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party.

In their letters, the authors noted the findings of the Winnipeg Indigenous Executive Circle and the Newcomer Education Coalition in their respective 2022 reports on the state of equity in education.

The findings, released in March, highlight disparities between the number of students and teachers who identify as Indigenous or racialized in Manitoba’s capital.

WIEC and the NEC argue that increasing the number of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit educators, as well as racialized immigrant, refugee, and newcomer teachers in the public school system, will improve outcomes for students who are members of these communities.

“A teacher doesn’t walk into a classroom and say, ‘I’m going to target these students,'” said Matthews, who has been involved in anti-racism education work since the 1980s.

However, biases, course content and language choices have lasting effects on students, she said.

In 2021, Manitoba’s four-year graduation rate was around 82% overall, but only 51% of Indigenous students in the province graduated “on time”.

For Matthews, maintaining the status quo is not an option. “It’s an era of racial reckoning,” she said.

Equity Matters wants all metropolitan divisions to begin developing local equity offices.

Late last year, the Winnipeg School Division Council voted unanimously to establish the first such office before the start of the 2022-23 school year.

Maggie Macintosh is a Local Journalism Initiative reporter who works for the WINNIPEG FREE PRESS. The Local Journalism Initiative is funded by the Government of Canada. Turtle Island News does not receive funding from the LJI government.

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New Knox County Schools Superintendent Announces Plans for School System https://taipeijs.org/new-knox-county-schools-superintendent-announces-plans-for-school-system/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 16:01:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/new-knox-county-schools-superintendent-announces-plans-for-school-system/ KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) — New Knox County Schools Superintendent Dr. Jon Rysewyk announced some of his plans for the school system on Tuesday. Dr. Rysewyk, who previously worked for the school system as an assistant superintendent, officially assumed his new role on Saturday. Dr. Rysewyk has said in the past that he plans to put […]]]>

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) — New Knox County Schools Superintendent Dr. Jon Rysewyk announced some of his plans for the school system on Tuesday. Dr. Rysewyk, who previously worked for the school system as an assistant superintendent, officially assumed his new role on Saturday.

Dr. Rysewyk has said in the past that he plans to put students first in the classroom. Specifically, he announced four of his main priorities for the future:

  • Excellence in foundational skills, especially early literacy and middle school math;
  • Provide excellent educators in every school;
  • Empowerment and career preparation;
  • Success for every student.

WVLT News spoke with Dr. Rysewyk, who said he wants to help prepare students for more than just crossing the stage at graduation.

“We really have to look at where we play in the community. Our role in the community is really to prepare students for their life after high school and expose them to their careers, not only making sure they cross the stage and graduate, but when they do, they’re prepared,” he said.

Dr. Rysewyk also announced details of the county’s school system going forward, including his plan to realign central office and foster community connections for Knox County Schools.

“Knox County is blessed with incredible educators and talented students,” Dr. Rysewyk said. “By establishing a clear vision of our goals and strategies, I believe our community can work together to achieve great things.”

Dr. Rysewyk also said he was looking to build relationships with potential partners.

“I think that’s one thing we want to do – see where can we partner, who in the community already has children at that age and how do we continue to build connections and strengthen those relationships,” he said. -he declares.

Dr. Rysewyk’s plan will include creating five regional teams with members focused on elementary and secondary schools, the new superintendent said. Each team will also include members with specific goals. As part of the realignment plan, school district officials said they also plan to create five assistant superintendent positions aimed at:

  • The Assistant Superintendent of Academics will include oversight of Learning and Literacy, Academic Supports, College and Career Readiness, and Regions 1-4;
  • The Deputy Superintendent of Business and Talent will oversee HR and the CFO;
  • The Assistant Superintendent of Student Success will oversee functions such as English Language Learning, Health Services, School Culture, Special Education, and Region 5;
  • The Assistant Superintendent of Operations will oversee functions such as security, transportation, and maintenance; and
  • The Deputy Superintendent of Strategy will oversee communications; Research, Evaluation and Evaluation (REA); and ESSER programming.

The deputy superintendent’s regions will be based on geography and feeding patterns, KCS officials said.

“As one of the largest districts in Tennessee, a one-size-fits-all approach will not provide the level of responsiveness our school communities deserve,” Dr. Rysewyk said. “I believe the regional teams will help us foster community engagement and ownership in the educational process, and shift the educational focus from the central office to the individual schools, where the most important work takes place.”

WVLT News contacted KCS officials, who said more information about the new positions would be released in the near future.

Copyright 2022 WVLT. All rights reserved.

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Your opinion on the French school system https://taipeijs.org/your-opinion-on-the-french-school-system/ Fri, 27 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/your-opinion-on-the-french-school-system/ French schools have a reputation for rigidity and pressure, with a French sociologist recently telling The Connexion that: “The system is built so that you never achieve excellence”. Read more: Education: does the French school deserve its bad reputation? We asked Report readers about their experiences of the French system, and while some said their […]]]>

French schools have a reputation for rigidity and pressure, with a French sociologist recently telling The Connexion that: “The system is built so that you never achieve excellence”.

Read more: Education: does the French school deserve its bad reputation?

We asked Report readers about their experiences of the French system, and while some said their children were “happy” at school, others criticized its “inflexible” and “elitist” nature.

“We found the teachers dedicated, kind and helpful”

Credit: Jennifer Clayton

Jennifer Clayton lives in Brittany with her husband Peter and her sons Jake (20) and Samuel (13) and has run a gite for 15 years. She said, “I think there’s a lot of emphasis on rote learning: poems in primary, then dates and historical events or chemical formulas in middle School.

“There seem to be few provisions for children that don’t fit the standard model of learning. My two got along pretty well, but I’ve heard from friends who had a lot more difficulty.

Ms Clayton added that Jake, who is now in his second year of university in Angers, and Samuel, who is currently in fourth, were both “happy overall. We found the teachers dedicated, kind and helpful, almost without exception.

“Jake was a internal (internal) during his high school years, and I think he would be the first to admit that he focused more on the social side than the academic side, and didn’t get the high school diploma he was capable of (not helped by the confinement That is).

“But he has had offers from UK universities and is very happy with his university French course (Applicable foreign languages).

“I think overall it’s a great system and I know my two have had opportunities and possibilities they never would have had had we stayed in the UK for their studies.

“Besides being truly bilingual, we would never have had the time or the money to organize the sports and other activities they had the opportunity to try. [if we were] United Kingdom.

“I think it’s especially important to maintain their written English as well as just chatting over dinner. So they both studied the UK curriculum online (with Blackhen Education which was superb) to IGCSE level.

“They settled in well and got good grades, I’m sure for students with learning difficulties or other issues it might not be as positive.”

Read more: Summary of French education: bac exams, school exchange deadline, career assistance

“For me, it was a nightmare”

Credit: Helen Magnusson/ The Guest House, Chamonix

Helen Magnusson, who runs a bed and breakfast in Chamonix with her husband, also had two sons, Sébastien and Alexandre, who were educated entirely in France.

Ms. Magnusson is Swedish, so her children grew up speaking English and Swedish at home.

“My eldest son is 18 now and doing his A-levels, and my youngest is 16 so he just did a year in high school,” she told The Connection.

“For me, it was a nightmare. If I could have put my children elsewhere I would have done it. I find him very authoritarian; they don’t listen to children. Children are not allowed to be children: they should sit down, be quiet and do as they are told.

“There is no flexibility, empathy or understanding that children are all different. If you don’t match exactly’in the mold‘ (in the mould) then it’s not easy.

She added that her sons “have been really unhappy. My eldest son was told by teachers that he is ‘bad‘ (waste).

“It’s a very international community here in Chamonix, and I hear that from a lot of foreigners who have children here. They get humiliated by the teachers in front of the class, they get put down, there is very little encouragement: they always point out what they are not good at.

“They start school too young”

“We don’t speak French at home, but when they were in primary school, their headmaster told me that you really shouldn’t speak English or Swedish at home. [So] there is not much support for children whose families are not French, who may need a little more help with the French language.

“Even with the English language, teachers won’t take corrections from bilingual children who speak it at a completely different level,” Ms Magnusson added.

“Because I have a guest rooms I have a lot of French clients and I have yet to meet a Frenchman, young or old, who can say that he liked the school.

“I have very fond memories of my school days in Sweden. I never saw someone shot down in front of the whole class. I don’t know how it is now but [when I was there] they listened more, were more friendly and less authoritarian.

“I also think they start school too early at age three. Although suitable [primary] school starts at age six, you’re still in the school system which is much, much more rigid than daycare. So there are long days and high expectations everywhere, and for some reason the knowledge bar always seems to be set too high. It’s very elitist.

“That attitude stays with them all through school and I would say France is losing a lot of talent because it’s all in math and science and French and they don’t appreciate you being good at art or languages. for example. The [former] are more weighted than other subjects, so those who work very hard and have very good grades in something else will never get the best grades.

“The whole thing is very unsympathetic, inflexible, too rigid and it breaks my heart; I can’t wait for mine to be finished. I love France but I hate school.

“Some students are inspired and others feel left out”

A retired English teacher living just outside Paris, who preferred not to be named in this article, said: “In French, they talk about a philosophy of ‘pulling up’ (pulling students upwards), which means that if the course is so difficult that only a few bright students pass, it will stimulate others to want to raise their skill level.

“And if you think it’s over when you graduate, think again, because raises and promotions are often based on competitions that take place in a similar mood in many places,” our reader added, who has taught the general public, university students, professors and researchers during his career.

“I could answer the question categorically and say that French education is too rigid and that students generally do better with less hierarchical methods. However, this would involve my own “Anglo-Saxon” criteria.

“It is difficult to make generalizations about the French education system, in part because it both originates from and reflects French culture, as opposed to teaching methods from other places.

“Some students are inspired and others feel left out. Those who benefited from this system were certainly the most competitive or those who were naturally intelligent. Students with other mindsets had to go through their educational experience motivating themselves because motivation did not come from school.

“Many of them enjoyed learning in the friendlier atmosphere of my classes which they generally hailed as ‘less scholarly’ during the feedback sessions.

“The important thing is to stimulate the student in a way that he understands”

“I find that people in France have a greater ability to understand and absorb large amounts of abstract input, and carry a lot more information in their heads than their counterparts in other countries.

“I found that the French’s love of mental comprehension often interfered with the other abilities needed to learn and produce language, the more physical demands of pronunciation, and the need to piece together comprehension when the e encounter a language that you don’t understand, and I insisted on giving more importance to these skills than to understanding the rules of grammar.

“Having lived almost 50 years among these people, I discovered that their criteria are very different from mine, the things they want to get out of education are different from what I wanted to get out of it when I was studying in them. UNITED STATES.

“With my French teacher at the University of Los Angeles, I was drawn to her teaching because she was stricter and expected more of her students than the less demanding American teachers who didn’t challenge me enough.

“The important thing is to stimulate the student in a way that they can understand, and each culture has different ideas of how to do this, stemming from their traditions and their evolution.

“For example, the French, unlike the Americans (and I guess people from other English-speaking countries), correct themselves in public when someone slips up and makes a mistake in their native French language. Everyone is used to that. here.

“In my English conversation classes, I already noted the mistakes made to discuss them at the end of the class, and I asked the participants not to correct the mistakes of others, no matter how blatant. It was incredibly difficult to put into practice for many of them, who were shouting a correction from across the room because they couldn’t bear to hear the error.

“I’ve had a lot of people correct me mid-sentence like that. Personally, I don’t appreciate this embarrassing interruption, but I’ve come to realize that these people are trying to help me the only way they know how, and it’s not overkill or rudeness.

“French students in a language class expect to be corrected and there is a received idea in France about learning the language that if you are not corrected at the very moment you do an error, we forget the correction.

“Before class started, I explained a bit about what’s called the ‘affective filter’, that being corrected makes someone so self-aware that they make more little mistakes because their mind is busy avoiding the fat ones.

“It has always taken several weeks of lessons before the students adapt to these ideas and the atmosphere thus created has improved the conversation skills of many people who were totally stuck at the start of the year.

“I don’t think any education system is perfect, and certainly the best ones are hybrid, and I’m happy to see the French education system opening up, sometimes to the chagrin of parents attached to more traditional behavior. a class.

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French deputy: why I accelerated the law against bullying at school

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Coweta County School System Honors 2022 Teachers of the Year https://taipeijs.org/coweta-county-school-system-honors-2022-teachers-of-the-year/ Thu, 26 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/coweta-county-school-system-honors-2022-teachers-of-the-year/ Macie Fleming, a third-grade teacher at Welch Elementary School, is Coweta County’s 2022 Teacher of the Year. Fleming was recognized at a celebration of the school system’s 33 Grade Level Teachers of the Year, held Tuesday at the Nixon Center for Performing and Visual Arts. “I am touched and honored to be here surrounded by […]]]>

Macie Fleming, a third-grade teacher at Welch Elementary School, is Coweta County’s 2022 Teacher of the Year.

Fleming was recognized at a celebration of the school system’s 33 Grade Level Teachers of the Year, held Tuesday at the Nixon Center for Performing and Visual Arts.

“I am touched and honored to be here surrounded by such incredible, talented and passionate educators who have made such a difference in the lives of our students every day,” said Fleming.

Fleming, who graduated from Newnan High School in 2015, first came to Welch in 2018 as a student teacher. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education from West Georgia University the same year, graduating with a Master of Education in Elementary Education in 2021.

She taught kindergarten at Welch from January to May 2019, then taught second grade for two years. Fleming is completing her first year as a third-grade teacher at Welch.

Brandavious Mann, special education teacher at Newnan High, and Adrienne Kocin, math teacher and family engagement coordinator at Evans Middle, were also selected as finalists for the honor.

All Coweta County Teachers of the Year are honored at an annual ceremony sponsored by the Coweta County School Board and the Newnan Pilot Club. They are selected at the school level by the other certified teachers in their school.

Teachers of the Year are chosen in recognition of exemplary teaching and serve as ambassadors for their profession.

This year’s winners represent grade levels from kindergarten to grade 12 and come from a wide range of educational disciplines, including elementary education, math, science, language arts and history, l special education, physical education, drama and school media services.

They understand:

Symony Griffiths, Special Education, Arbor Springs Elementary

Lauranne Payne, Kindergarten, Arnco-Sargent Elementary

Kristen Yates, fifth grade, Atkinson Elementary

Lisa Luker, first grade, Brooks Elementary

Amanda Stevens, second grade, Canongate Elementary

Lisa Bourque, second grade, Eastside Elementary

Laura Hightower, first grade, Elm Street Elementary

Angela Nouryeh, first year, Empower program

Michelle Turner, second grade, Glanton Elementary

Charlene St. John, first grade, Jefferson Parkway Elementary

Katie Capshaw, third grade, Moreland Elementary

Amy Cooper, first grade, Newnan Crossing Elementary

Olivia Strozier, Special Education, Northside Elementary

Robin DeMent, EIP, Poplar Road Primary School

Austen Martin, second grade, Ruth Hill Elementary

Kara Fretwell, Kindergarten, Thomas Crossroads Elementary

Kara Hooper, fourth-grade math, Western Elementary

Ashlee Grace Chitwood, music, White Oak Elementary

Whitney Kling, Special Education, Willis Road Elementary

Jennifer Davis, eighth grade social studies, Arnall Middle

Ashley Dawson, eighth grade, Blake Bass Middle

Stephanie Ferrari, Grade Six and Seven Gifted Science, East Coweta Middle

Laura Dalton eighth grade math, Lee Middle

Jennifer Rogers, Special Education, Maggie Brown Middle

Jeff Welch, eighth grade Georgia Studies, Madras Middle

Donny Blacksher, Health and Physical Education, Smokey Road Middle

Vickie Waldrop, Special Education Grades 8-12, Central Educational Center

Pamela Foulks, Family Consumer Science, East Coweta High

Cassie Scott-Fortune, theater and theater manager, Northgate High

Nekada Lewis, Media Specialist, Winston Dowdell Academy

As Teacher of the Year, Fleming will also be Coweta County’s nominee for Georgia’s 2022 Teacher of the Year.

]]> Op-ed: How the NYC school system can support immigrant children https://taipeijs.org/op-ed-how-the-nyc-school-system-can-support-immigrant-children/ Wed, 25 May 2022 14:44:49 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/op-ed-how-the-nyc-school-system-can-support-immigrant-children/ According to this year’s testimony by Advocates for Children of New York, nearly one in four ELLs in New York City dropped out of high school in 2020, and only 46 percent graduated from high school within four years. In January 2021, attendance for ELL 10th graders was 10 percentage points lower than it was […]]]>

According to this year’s testimony by Advocates for Children of New York, nearly one in four ELLs in New York City dropped out of high school in 2020, and only 46 percent graduated from high school within four years. In January 2021, attendance for ELL 10th graders was 10 percentage points lower than it was in 2019.

Young newcomers were also particularly vulnerable to the stress of the pandemic, which has accelerated a mental health crisis among all young people. Concentrated in New York City neighborhoods hardest hit by the pandemic and often experiencing extreme economic insecurity, stripped of support networks in their home countries and with inadequate technology and sometimes only fragile ties to peers and teachers , students were left adrift when schools closed.

To address the heightened challenges faced by newcomer youth, New York City must invest in thoughtful, education-based infrastructure. There are 15 International Network Secondary Schools in the city, geared towards the needs of immigrant ELL teenagers. The schools have a relatively successful track record of serving and graduating their multilingual students. There are also five ELL transfer schools designed to meet the needs of newly arrived immigrants between the ages of 16 and 21.

Of more than 500 New York City high schools, 83% enroll ELLs. And at most schools, especially those where ELLs make up only a small portion of the student population, ELL graduation rates are woefully low.

Practices that meet the needs of newcomer students need to be more widely adopted. Schools that serve large numbers of newcomers, for example, should become “trauma-informed” to ensure students feel safe, supported, and prepared to learn. It is essential to provide a culturally appropriate social-emotional learning program for newcomer children.

Finally, we need an educational workforce that is both culturally competent and linguistically diverse. We also need to embrace technologies that allow educators to communicate with families in their native language.

Fortunately, many New York-area educators, administrators, politicians, and community advocates are actively engaged in such efforts, advocating for proper attention to be given to the newcomer population. And the city recently communicated an intention to invest in extended services.

At Columbia University teachers collegewe conduct research to identify key practices that support the mental health and academic success of newcomer students so that schools can serve them more effectively.

The energy and success of New York City – and our nation – has always been based on the contributions of new Americans. We owe them school experiences that allow their young people to succeed and flourish.

Prerna Arora is an assistant professor of school psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. Lorey Wheeler is an associate research professor at the Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools.

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Deal could end desegregation case in Alabama school system | https://taipeijs.org/deal-could-end-desegregation-case-in-alabama-school-system/ Tue, 24 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/deal-could-end-desegregation-case-in-alabama-school-system/ LaFAYETTE, Ala. – A federal judge will review a deal between the Justice Department, civil rights lawyers and school officials in an eastern Alabama county that could end more than 50 years of federal oversight of the desegregation of the system. Consent decree between Georgia line Chambers County school officials, government and Legal Defense Fund […]]]>

LaFAYETTE, Ala. – A federal judge will review a deal between the Justice Department, civil rights lawyers and school officials in an eastern Alabama county that could end more than 50 years of federal oversight of the desegregation of the system.

Consent decree between Georgia line Chambers County school officials, government and Legal Defense Fund attorneys includes construction of new school and more opportunities for black students in the county about 35,000 people, officials said.

The deal was announced on Friday to end a desegregation order that had been in place since 1970. It followed a previous tentative deal reached in 1993.

“We are pleased to arrive at a consent decree that addresses the many concerns our clients have raised as essential to ensuring the effectiveness of the desegregation process in Chambers County,” said GeDá Jones Herbert, attorney at Legal Defense fund. “It was especially important that black students in the district had equal, high-quality educational opportunities in safe, modern facilities.”

Under the agreement, the parties negotiated for years to reach the proposed settlement, announced nearly 70 years after the U.S. Supreme Court ordered an end to racial segregation in public schools.

“This proposed consent order reinforces the Civil Rights Division’s unwavering commitment to ensuring that all students receive the same educational opportunities to which they are entitled, regardless of race or color,” the Attorney General said. Deputy Kristen Clarke in a statement.

Under the agreement, the school district will form a desegregation advisory committee that will have its input on issues such as consolidating high school students and improving opportunities for students in science, technology, engineering, arts and math.

Before the end of the next school year, the district must choose a site to build a new Consolidated High School to replace LaFayette High School, which is heavily black, and Valley High School, which has a large white student population. The agreement stated that the new location “shall not place an unequal burden on students on the basis of race, to the extent practicable.”

Students in LaFayette, a majority black city, will temporarily transfer to the school in Valley, which is majority white, but not until the start of the school year after construction begins, according to the agreement.

The school system allowed no deliberate segregation.

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School system shocked by planned power outage at school https://taipeijs.org/school-system-shocked-by-planned-power-outage-at-school/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:17:08 +0000 https://taipeijs.org/school-system-shocked-by-planned-power-outage-at-school/ Photo: Google Maps BATON ROUGE — Entergy said Tuesday it was looking to “close any gaps” in communication between its team and its public school system client after a scheduled outage in the neighborhood around Parkview Elementary caught the school district by surprise. The East Baton Rouge Parish School System said earlier in the day […]]]>

Photo: Google Maps

BATON ROUGE — Entergy said Tuesday it was looking to “close any gaps” in communication between its team and its public school system client after a scheduled outage in the neighborhood around Parkview Elementary caught the school district by surprise.

The East Baton Rouge Parish School System said earlier in the day it had to close the campus and move its students to another campus to complete the school day.

The school district said it was never notified of the planned outage.

Entergy said the outage in the Parkview Oaks neighborhood near Jefferson Hwy. and the airline was scheduled for crews to “safely perform reliability work on the electrical system”.

Electricity was cut in the area around 11 a.m. The school district called it a “blackout” and said it would close campus for the duration of the day.

Power was restored before the 3 p.m. cut-off time set by Entergy for customers.

The utility company said it was working to solidify its communication process: “While customers in the region were notified through their preferred communication channel (phone, text and/or email), we are reviewing communications with the school and will fill in any gaps prior to future scheduled outages.”

According to EBR Schools, the children were taken by bus to Woodlawn Middle School, about two miles away on Tiger Bend Road. Parents were encouraged to pick up their children from the Woodlawn campus during regular departure times.

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